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Why do you believe in God?


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#1 Jakob

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 04:36 PM

Just like the title says, why do you believe in God? I enjoy hearing individuals logic and reasoning behind god. I also enjoy hearing how and when they found the faith and why they believe in it. Tell me whatever is on your mind about Religion. I love hearing everyone's personal stories.

 

I'd like to finish up by saying.. I am not here to start a fight or attack another persons Religion. I do not believe in a Religion but, I can neither confirm nor deny a god exists. I am simply Agnostic. I just want to hear what people have to say.

 



#2 Guest_Spider Monkey_*

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 04:58 PM

One of two reasons.

A: Mommy and daddy forced religion down their throat from infancy to adulthood and drug them to church until it was embedded in their brain.

B: They "found Jesus" whether life was a wreck. Religion is a great self-esteem booster when you're broke, lonely, in jail, etc.

#3 CatofWar

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 05:21 PM

I don't believe in the Christian god. I think there was truth to past mythology though and one day the "gods" will return on their chariots of fire from the sky.

#4 Panthro

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 05:38 PM

This won't turn out well.

I'm a Christian and some days I believe in something greater other days not so much. I don't practice out of fear or uncertainty but because I think Jesus truly led the kind of life we should model ourselves after. If in the end I'm wrong I'll still be ok with it as I work to make a positive impact in a Christ like manner

#5 Anybodyhome

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 05:59 PM

I think I was almost there at some point in my life when I was trying to make sense out of everything.

 

Once I saw people die- both those I knew and served with and those we were trying to kill- that's when everything changed forever. Once I saw civil war in Somalia, once I saw the Iran-Iraq War, once I saw a list of dead sailors on the USS Stark and knew about 4 of them, once I saw what a 20mm chain gun can do to a dhow with a few ragheads and RPGs in it....

 

Yeah, not so much anymore.



#6 PhillyB

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 06:10 PM

random thoughts:

 

if there is a god i'm pretty sure we've either pissed it off or it just doesn't care, but either way it's hard for me to swallow the claims of any of the monotheistic religions or anything claiming divine revelation/personal relationships.

 

regarding religion, i'm currently interested in exploring religious functionalism - that is, the actual, structural, real-world purpose belief in a deity serves individuals who subscribe to it, serving to elevate its power (for either good or bad depending on how you use/view it.)

 

in the past five years i have undergone significant transformation in my belief systems, adjusting from a methodology of accepting or rejecting data based on my predetermined conclusion to building up as much data as possible, analyzing each bit objectively, and building my worldview on it, modifying it as i intake data that swings me to one direction or another, constantly pursuing it so as to build the most educated, intelligent one possible. the constantly-changing nature of this sort of thing, especially when juxtaposed against my social context of bazillions of fundamentalist christians, makes it a sort of perilous, uncomfortable existence, and i recognize that it would be much easier to reject critical thought and "just believe" as was implored to me by a friend who told me that archaeology is hocus-pocus devil's work and radiocarbon dating is faulty because it says so on answersingenesis.com... but it's not something i can do with any sort of intellectual honesty. once that crack has formed there's no gluing it back together again.

 

i would probably describe myself as post-theist. j.s. spong does a fine job of outlining a synthesis between the rejection of literal elements of the christian creed which cannot be accepted as individual, case-by-case isolated events with any seriousness and posits a post-theism wherein god is not something that can be believed or disbelieved any more than we can believe or disbelieve wind or love or our existence, for if god is god to the extent that godness allows then the god which an atheist disbelieves is not god at all, but a limited culturally-framed, filtered, and constructed god whose reachability is defined accordingly. if you are interested in finding a way to reconcile logical faults in structural christianity and the fact that the teachings of jesus christ have life-giving, world-changing potential and determining a way to make the best of the one in spite of the other without rejecting them both wholesale i recommend giving spong more than a cursory glance.

 

i have many more random thoughts but those are a few



#7 Jakob

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 06:15 PM

One of two reasons.

A: Mommy and daddy forced religion down their throat from infancy to adulthood and drug them to church until it was embedded in their brain.
 

 

I don't find that to be completely true.

 

From an early age I had Christianity and Conservative political views forced upon me. Since I was 11 or 12 I've always considered myself as an Agnostic with political views that lean far left. I don't think my parents had much of an affect on my views.

This won't turn out well.

I'm a Christian and some days I believe in something greater other days not so much. I don't practice out of fear or uncertainty but because I think Jesus truly led the kind of life we should model ourselves after. If in the end I'm wrong I'll still be ok with it as I work to make a positive impact in a Christ like manner

No problem with that. It's a good reason to believe.

 

I think I was almost there at some point in my life when I was trying to make sense out of everything.

 

Once I saw people die- both those I knew and served with and those we were trying to kill- that's when everything changed forever. Once I saw civil war in Somalia, once I saw the Iran-Iraq War, once I saw a list of dead sailors on the USS Stark and knew about 4 of them, once I saw what a 20mm chain gun can do to a dhow with a few ragheads and RPGs in it....

 

Yeah, not so much anymore.

I really don't know what to say, if I had witnessed something like that I'm not sure what I would believe anymore.



#8 TheRumGone

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 06:17 PM

i use to think that something can't come from nothing so i thought that at the very least there was a creator. Then somebody asked me to give an example of what nothing was. That stumped me. So i honestly have no fuging idea. I think i'm a good person though so when i die if something crazy does happen like heaven or a God is in front of "me", i think i will be ok. if not fug it.



#9 Jakob

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 06:19 PM

random thoughts:

 

if there is a god i'm pretty sure we've either pissed it off or it just doesn't care, but either way it's hard for me to swallow the claims of any of the monotheistic religions or anything claiming divine revelation/personal relationships.

 

regarding religion, i'm currently interested in exploring religious functionalism - that is, the actual, structural, real-world purpose belief in a deity serves individuals who subscribe to it, serving to elevate its power (for either good or bad depending on how you use/view it.)

 

in the past five years i have undergone significant transformation in my belief systems, adjusting from a methodology of accepting or rejecting data based on my predetermined conclusion to building up as much data as possible, analyzing each bit objectively, and building my worldview on it, modifying it as i intake data that swings me to one direction or another, constantly pursuing it so as to build the most educated, intelligent one possible. the constantly-changing nature of this sort of thing, especially when juxtaposed against my social context of bazillions of fundamentalist christians, makes it a sort of perilous, uncomfortable existence, and i recognize that it would be much easier to reject critical thought and "just believe" as was implored to me by a friend who told me that archaeology is hocus-pocus devil's work and radiocarbon dating is faulty because it says so on answersingenesis.com... but it's not something i can do with any sort of intellectual honesty. once that crack has formed there's no gluing it back together again.

 

i would probably describe myself as post-theist. j.s. spong does a fine job of outlining a synthesis between the rejection of literal elements of the christian creed which cannot be accepted as individual, case-by-case isolated events with any seriousness and posits a post-theism wherein god is not something that can be believed or disbelieved any more than we can believe or disbelieve wind or love or our existence, for if god is god to the extent that godness allows then the god which an atheist disbelieves is not god at all, but a limited culturally-framed, filtered, and constructed god whose reachability is defined accordingly. if you are interested in finding a way to reconcile logical faults in structural christianity and the fact that the teachings of jesus christ have life-giving, world-changing potential and determining a way to make the best of the one in spite of the other without rejecting them both wholesale i recommend giving spong more than a cursory glance.

 

i have many more random thoughts but those are a few

 

I completely agree with what you just said, I had a lot of good questions for you but my mind kept going back to this..

 

 

as was implored to me by a friend who told me that archaeology is hocus-pocus devil's work and radiocarbon dating is faulty because it says so on answersingenesis.com

 

A human in the year 2013 said this to you? That makes my head hurt.



#10 mav1234

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 06:21 PM

i teach a class on evolution at the undergraduate level in massachusetts.

 

we have young earth creationists in the class sometimes.

 

heh.



#11 PhillyB

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 06:26 PM

A human in the year 2013 said this to you? That makes my hurt hurt.

 

that's what happens when you're socialized in a bubble and are taught worldviews that argue against straw man versions of bad-guy stuff like evolution. you can dismiss whatever you want because as long as you invoke god you're automatically in the clear. there's zero accountability for your beliefs, however silly they may be, because opposition to them is categorically dismissed.

 

it's an epistemological mind-fug and there is almost no way to get out of it if you're born into such circumstances.



#12 Jakob

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 06:29 PM

that's what happens when you're socialized in a bubble and are taught worldviews that argue against straw man versions of bad-guy stuff like evolution. you can dismiss whatever you want because as long as you invoke god you're automatically in the clear. there's zero accountability for your beliefs, however silly they may be, because opposition to them is categorically dismissed.

 

it's an epistemological mind-fug and there is almost no way to get out of it if you're born into such circumstances.

I'm still trying to comprehend this. I've never heard of anyone in my life that thinks carbon dating is bogus. Was this person dropped as a baby?



#13 TheRumGone

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 06:31 PM

I'm still trying to comprehend this. I've never heard of anyone in my life that thinks carbon dating is bogus. Was this person dropped as a baby?

 

it's called brainwashing



#14 PhillyB

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 06:41 PM

I'm still trying to comprehend this. I've never heard of anyone in my life that thinks carbon dating is bogus. Was this person dropped as a baby?

 

arguing from conclusion is a fundamental methodological flaw of religious fundamentalists. anyone seeking an unbiased perspective of things would obvious examine everything that encompasses RCD, from its history to its application to corroborating methods that verify its effectiveness and accuracy, and determine that there's really no rational reason to reject it. however, someone heavily invested in the world being 7,000 years old could simply read one article online by a religious authority figure - someone like lee strobel or whoever else is ponying up articles on answersfromgenesis - and reject the entirety of RCD just like that.

 

it comes down to this: fundamentalists demand absurdly high standards of evidence for claims which run contrary to theirs (and usually still reject it) while demanding little, if any, actual evidence for the beliefs that they inherited with little, if any, agency of their own. it's the ultimate epistemological folly, and it's frighteningly common.



#15 SooSlow84

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 07:12 PM

One of two reasons:

They don't know any better

The can't accept that death is the end.


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