Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Affordable Care Act

52 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

I agree but for now at least the ACA is expanding access. But if things keep going where they are going I don't see the middle class(or the former middle class) taking much more of it. The rich get richer and poor get poorer. Minimum wage has become garbage. We just physically can't keep at it forever. If you have ever read the Communist Manifesto it eerily and hauntingly foreshadows this. Not saying that we will overthrow the bourgeoisie and become pure communist but there will be a breaking point. We should be more of a social capitol gov't then what we are now with what is overrun with greed. We should have free health care. We have the right to life and to pursue happiness means to have a healthy life. Health is more than a product. It is something more innately moral than auto insurance or the alike. Some will gladly preach that the life of a fetus is special and human, yet the uninsured are SOL.
 

 

 

Very god point and I applaud you for getting to where you are in the business.  So you don't grow anymore for now.  Say down the road what would be the threshold that would make you cross 50? Say you get a contract that required you to hire 10?20? people that would cover ACA and keep the profits rolling in?  Once you crossed that threshold you could grow the company to 100-200 and make more money. 

 

Point I was trying to make earlier was you would have more small business owners popping up now as like you said 50 is a big hurdle for you.  You even pointed out you get $300k a year which I am sure you deserve (seriously) the stress of running a business and having <50 people looking up to you for leadership can be stressing. 

 

If you don't grow above 50 then another company could be started and that owner would be making $300k or some salary like that which spreads the wealth to more people.  If the supply and demand calls for it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I think the small business term is all about perspective. In a small town with 20k people, employing 50 may make you one of the largest in the town. Having a business with 50 employees in a place like LA or NYC and you are a fly on somebody else's wall. Look at your big box retailers. They have thousands of employees nationwide. I would think a non chain grocery store would employ more than 50 people and I consider that individual store a small business. With so many businesses now being on a national and even international level, I can tell you that I feel like a very tiny fish in one very big pond. Again, I think the small business term is very relative to the industry you are in and where you are located.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I do not have health insurance because I cannot afford it.  My job pays for half but the other half is out of my price range.  I also cannot afford to get it through the exchanges as the cheapest plan has virtually the same premium and cannot get subsidies since I was told that the insurance through my job is affordable even though I cannot afford it.  If I lived somewhere else in the country with a lower cost of living and made the same amount of money then it is possible that I could afford it, of course if I lived in one of those places then I would be making less than I do now.

 

I am sure that this law does help some people, but at this point I am not one of them.  The fact that I am going to be fined for not purchasing something that I cannot afford seems silly to me.  I guess I could do what Congress does and simply borrow.  At least the fine is small the first year and I should be in a position to get 100% coverage through my job by next fall but I cannot be the only person stuck in the middle like this.  There has to be a better way of determining what someone can and cannot afford than whatever they are doing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I think the small business term is all about perspective. In a small town with 20k people, employing 50 may make you one of the largest in the town. Having a business with 50 employees in a place like LA or NYC and you are a fly on somebody else's wall. Look at your big box retailers. They have thousands of employees nationwide. I would think a non chain grocery store would employ more than 50 people and I consider that individual store a small business. With so many businesses now being on a national and even international level, I can tell you that I feel like a very tiny fish in one very big pond. Again, I think the small business term is very relative to the industry you are in and where you are located.

 

 

Which brings up another point.  Usually the biggest employer in a community is the local hospital.  How will ACA effect them? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Very god point and I applaud you for getting to where you are in the business.  So you don't grow anymore for now.  Say down the road what would be the threshold that would make you cross 50? Say you get a contract that required you to hire 10?20? people that would cover ACA and keep the profits rolling in?  Once you crossed that threshold you could grow the company to 100-200 and make more money. 

 

Point I was trying to make earlier was you would have more small business owners popping up now as like you said 50 is a big hurdle for you.  You even pointed out you get $300k a year which I am sure you deserve (seriously) the stress of running a business and having <50 people looking up to you for leadership can be stressing. 

 

If you don't grow above 50 then another company could be started and that owner would be making $300k or some salary like that which spreads the wealth to more people.  If the supply and demand calls for it.

 I don't make 300k, I was just using that breakdown as an example. I don't employ near 50 either. Down the road there may be a point that I get offered a contract that would make me exceed the limit. This year there was one that was pretty close to pushing me there but I felt it was too much growth too fast and I didn't want to put my employees into a bad situation when the ACA rolled out. I took a wait and see how it all unfolds approach. I don't know what the contract would have to be to get me to get in the middle of all of that. 

 

The point I was really trying to make was when growing a business there are always obstacles that have to be faced. Being required by law to obtain insurance and pay for it while your competition does not is an extremely scary reality. For some people, owning a catering truck might be their dream. Others may want to build a software consulting firm. I do landscape maintenance and installation. Each individual is different. My industry is 95% small time companies and a couple larger one. I've never been one to dream small. I guess when I get to that point where I'm actually at that threshold, I'll decide. At that point I may already be able to provide private insurance for my employees. Time will tell. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce view:

 

You have to see this one for yourself. Yesterday, Senator Harry Reid took to the Senate floor to claim that the health care law “doesn’t hurts jobs at all.”

 

You can’t make it up. He actually cites a New York times article to reinforce his claim that the law doesn’t impact the job market. Read a bit further down though and the same article references our recent small business survey showing 75% of small businesses say the health care law has made it harder to hire. Direct quote: “Of those affected by the employer mandate, half said they would cut employees’ hours or replace full-time workers with part-time.”

It’s time for Harry Reid to live in the world of reality. Uncertainty from Obamacare and penalties for not providing coverage are creating a nation of part-time workers.  Last month's job report shows the lowest workforce participation rate in 35 years. Employers across the country are scaling back and battening down the hatches in anticipation for the law’s implementation.

But don’t take it from me. Below is just a sampling of recent headlines about the health care law:

 

  • The Wall Street Journal Abstracts: “Obamacare vs. Small Businesses.”
  • The Star Tribune: “Obamacare Now Begins To Reveal Itself; Expect Some Businesses To Stop Hiring And Others To Drop Health Coverage.”
  • The Baltimore Sun: “Lost Jobs, Higher Costs; Obamacare Hits Home.”
  • The Boston Herald: “Experts: Obamacare Could Hit Paycheck.”
  • The Australian Financial Review: “Exporters Reluctant To Hire Full-Timers As Obamacare Obligations Loom.”
  • The Chicago Tribune: “The Part-Timing Of America/ Obamacare Will Push Workers - Not Just Employers – To Cut Hours.”
  • The Orange County Register: “Health Law May Chill Hiring.”
  • The Kansas City Star: “Involuntary Part Time Jobs Are Growing.”
  • The Columbus Dispatch: “Unhealthy Side Effects; Employers Seek Ways To Avoid Health-Care Law’s Burdens.”
  • The Columbus Dispatch: Unintended Consequences; Thanks To Health-Care Law, Many Employees Are Seeing Hours Cut.”
  • The New York Times: “Surge In Part-Time Work.”
  • The Orlando Sentinel: “Workers’ Hours Cut – Obamacare Blamed.”
  • The Atlanta Journal-Constitution: “The Obamacare Economy: 35 Part-Time Jobs For Every New Full-Time Job.”
  • Investor’s Business Daily: “Obamacare Spurs Shift Away From 30-40 Hour Work Week.”
  • The Washington Post: “Health-Care Law Is Tied To New Caps On Work Hours For Part-Timers.”
  • WJFW News: “Obamacare Forces Trig’s To Limit Workers’ Hours.”
  • The Los Angeles Times: “Small Businesses To Cut Hours And Workers Due To Obama Health Care Law, Survey Says.”
  • The Indianapolis Star: “Health-Care Tax Plan Threatens Hoosier Jobs.”
  • The Arizona Republic: “Obama Agenda Crushing Employment.”

Instead of engaging in political theatre, we need leaders who will work to fix the most burdensome provisions of Obamacare and start focusing on free enterprise policies that remove the burdens of big government and allow our entrepreneurs and free market to grow. And those members of Congress who voted to make the health care bill law should be held accountable for their vote in 2014.

 

Rob Engstrom
SVP and National Political Director
U.S. Chamber of Commerce

 

http://www.friendsoftheuschamber.com/blog/post/harry-reid---obamacare-doesnt-hurt-jobs-at-all

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Paying workers affects how many people businesses can hire let's do away with that job killer
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

What's great is that these yahoos are the one screaming about entitlements but will want to keep things in the ACA they like and don't cost anyone anything then complain about how obummer care is not paying for itself

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

if we can get enough dipshit teapartiers willing to ignore the insurance lobby in favor of their dumb, fat guts, maybe they'll repeal the mandate but leave in the pre-existing conditions part and destroy the industry entirely

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

http://youtu.be/afREhQlCn90

 

Is it wrong to think the best way forward is dictatorship after watching this?

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Some interesting quotes from this article on Yahoo...

 

 

Rarely has a government program rollout resulted in the level of disaster as the Affordable Care Act (ACA) exchanges over their first two weeks. The White House refuses to release enrollment statistics that should be easily gleaned from internal systems serving the exchange sites, if those servers actually remained up and running. On both of its two weekends, technicians spent long hours attempting to fix the myriad problems that stymie consumers, only to have the problems persist — even when site traffic should be low, as CNN's Elizabeth Cohen discovered on Monday.

Small wonder, then, that no one really knows how many have managed to actually buy a health-insurance policy through the federal exchange. The Daily Mail sought out answers from the insurance industry, and got estimates of 51,000 after one week — a pace that would have just two million people covered properly by the March 2014 deadline to comply with the individual mandate, far below the 30 million uninsured that the ACA was intended to assist.

 

Surprise!  The gov't can't do shit right.

 

 

 

 

 

Then there are the prices for the plans, which have given Americans their first taste of sticker shock from ObamaCare. The Department of Health and Human Services tried to get in front of the big jumps in premiums by claiming that the HHS-approved prices were "lower than projected," but Forbes' Avik Roy pointed out that the projections used by HHS for comparison were for 2016, not 2014. Prices for comparable coverage doubled, according to an analysis of HHS data by Roy and the Manhattan Institute. And for some the prices quadrupled.

---

The Tribune's Peter Frost found that a typical user in the system — a 33-year-old single father in this case — would see his premiums "more than double" from its current average of $233 a month. But if the single dad wants his premiums to remain in range, he'll need to sign up for an annual deductible of $12,700. The average deductible before ObamaCare for this consumer would have been $3,500.

 

Nor is that an isolated example, although it's on the far end of the spectrum. In order to keep prices low, 21 of the 22 approved plans on the Illinois state exchange have deductibles of more than $4,000 for individuals, and $8,000 for families. Frost notes that the average employer-based coverage puts the individual deductible at $1,100.

 

 

Based on those figures, who exactly is this act supposed to be helping?

 

 

 

Thanks to the ACA, we have the worst of both worlds. Some consumers now have to pay enormous premiums for coverage they can't access until they pay enormous out-of-pocket expenses first, while insurers have to cover even more risk, and providers have to deal with even more red tape. When voters start paying through the nose in this system, they will soon recognize that the administration's ideas of reform are as workable in real life as their ObamaCare exchange website

 

Sounds like a great plan.

 

 

Keep in mind here partisans... I'm not blaming Obama... I'm not blaming the Dems or Pubs.... I'm blaming them all...

It's a typical half-assed attempt by our government to do something that really needed done but they can't get out of their own way, nor away from the deep pockets that own them, to do it right...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

http://washingtonexaminer.com/obamacare-shock-12600-deductible-40-percent-co-pay-zero-competition/article/2537200

 


-- A $12,600 deductible. CNNMoney reported that one family “found a bronze-level plan for roughly $357 a month, after their subsidy, which they could swing. But it comes with a $12,600 family deductible.”

-- Enormous rate increases. A research group found that a 30-year-old male nonsmoker “will see his lowest cost insurance option increase 260 percent.”

-- Some who already buy their own insurance are receiving cancellation notices -- and offers for expensive new policies. The Christian Science Monitor reported on a North Carolina family who had been buying Blue Cross and Blue Shield insurance for $380-a-month. “BCBS is offering them a new plan for three times the cost, $1,124.50 a month, still with an $11,000 deductible,” reports the paper.

-- A California couple said that the Obamacare policy suggested to them included a 40 percent increase in their doctor's office co-pay. “Our co-pay skyrocketed from 0 percent to 40 percent and the maximum out-of-pocket increased an additional $2,300,” according to a letter in the Fresno Bee.

-- Kaiser Health News found a lack of competition in some pockets of the country. “Eighteen percent of counties have only one insurer offering plans and 33 percent of counties have only two insurers competing.”

— There is little uniformity to premiums charged around the nation. “For instance,” Kaiser also reported, “Cigna is offering 50-year-olds one of its midlevel plans for $614 if they live in Flagstaff, Ariz. That same plan, contracting with different hospitals and doctors, will cost $428 in Phoenix and just $395 in Nashville.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites



  • Latest Articles

  • Recent Comments