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Footage of racist Philly cops goes viral


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#16 teeray

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 01:02 PM

Most racist place I have ever been was Pennsylvania.

#17 teeray

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 01:20 PM

Oh yea? And you know this how?

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How do you know what we know?

#18 Ccat

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 01:49 PM

How do you know what we know?


Well I happen to know a little bit about law enforcement training

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#19 Floppin

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 01:58 PM

Well I happen to know a little bit about law enforcement training

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I'm pretty sure that he wasn't talking about BLET



#20 Darth Biscuit

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 02:19 PM

Well I happen to know a little bit about law enforcement training

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Not sure where you're going with this CCAT but search "cops take camera" on Youtube and I think you'll get the general idea that no, cops don't want you filming them, even though the courts have said we have the right to do so.



#21 NanuqoftheNorth

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 04:39 PM

Oh yea? And you know this how?

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The Philadelphia Police Department has a long and checkered history when it comes to abusive behavior towards minorities.  If you have any familiarity with the city's law enforcement history, you will know this to be true.

 

Here is a Philadelphia Police Officer (retired) talking about his treatment on the streets of Philadelphia recently.

 

Herbert Spellman, a retired cop who said in a cover story in yesterday's Daily News that he was subjected to a "demeaning" stop and frisk last month, called on police brass (Philadelphia) to send a message to patrol cops that verbally and physically abusive behavior won't be tolerated.

 

"It starts at the top," Spellman said. 

 

http://articles.phil...eo-north-philly

 

Here are some excerpts from the story:

 

Spellman gave nearly 20 years of his life to the Philadelphia Police Department, retiring in 2008.

 

On Sept. 10, (2013) walking to a bus stop in West Oak Lane, Spellman found himself on the other side of the police department's controversial stop-and-frisk policy, he said.

 

"Demeaning," "nasty," "ridiculous" and "illegal" are the words that come to his mind when he recounts the incident. They weren't police tactics he recognized from his time on the force.

 

He said he showed the officers his retired police ID, but it didn't help.

 

"I don't know what's going on with this police department, but it's terrible," he said.

 

Spellman, 50, a married father of four, said the officers went through his wallet without his permission, forcefully frisked him and put him in the back of the police cruiser. He said they asked why he was "so far from home," accused him of being on drugs and told him to "shut the f--- up" when he asked why he was being stopped. His cellphone screen was shattered in the process.

 

The experience made Spellman realize what can happen to innocent civilians when they become suspects in the eyes of cops. Spellman, who is black, still doesn't know why he was targeted, but he couldn't help but notice that the two cops who stopped him and the four or five backup officers who arrived were white.

 

"I don't want to turn it into a racial issue, but that's what it felt like," Spellman said of racial profiling. "When my son leaves the house, I'm going to tell him to be more careful of cops than crooks. Me, being an injured officer with ID, and they're giving me that much trouble? I can't imagine someone without credentials."

 

http://articles.phil...-police-tactics

 

 

Half of all PPD stops last year were made without reasonable suspicion:

 

Spellman's allegations are all too familiar to Paul Messing, a civil-rights lawyer who is working with the state chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union to monitor the stop-and-frisk program as part of a 2011 legal settlement. In a report to U.S. District Judge Stewart Dalzell in March, Messing and the ACLU flagged an "intolerably high level" of unlawful pedestrian stops in Philly.

 

The group's analysis concluded that nearly half of the 215,000 stops last year were made without reasonable suspicion of a crime. Minorities accounted for 76 percent of the stops and 85 percent of the frisks, according to the report. The ACLU estimated that guns were recovered in 0.16 percent of stops, according to an analysis of police sample data.

 

"A program that was designed to find guns is not accomplishing that goal," Messing said. "It doesn't work. All these folks are having their rights violated for nothing."  http://articles.phil...-police-tactics

 

The Philadelphia PD is now being sued for unlawful arrest of civilians who video record police officers in public.  If these two recent incidents and countless others like them are any indication, is it any wonder why the PPD doesn't want the public recording their actions?

 

In the video, (Officer) Nace didn't provide a clear explanation of why the men were stopped. Roper questioned whether there was reasonable suspicion that a crime had been committed.

 

The ACLU estimates that nearly half of the more than 200,000 annual pedestrians stopped are lacking reasonable suspicion, but the Police Department has disputed that.

 

""This is exactly what the city of Philadelphia says its cops don't do," said Mary Catherine Roper, senior staff attorney for the state chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, which is monitoring the city's stop-and-frisk program. "The only way we stop it from happening is if the Police Department acknowledges that it does happen and takes steps to root it out."

 

Roper, is also suing the department for alleged wrongful arrests of people who videotape police in public, said the Nace video is clear evidence that the department needs to impose better standards of behavior.

 

"Can we start with 'not thoroughly abusive' as an initial goal?" Roper asked. "I'd like to get to respectful, but let's start with not abusive."

http://articles.phil...eo-north-philly

 

 

 



#22 Ccat

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 04:56 PM

I was more disagreeing with them being taught not to get caught on camera. Not their history of treating others wrongly. I can't speak for Philadelphia specifically, but that's certainly not how we are taught around my area.

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#23 NanuqoftheNorth

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 05:35 PM

I was more disagreeing with them being taught not to get caught on camera. Not their history of treating others wrongly. I can't speak for Philadelphia specifically, but that's certainly not how we are taught around my area.

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Lots of good cops out there no doubt, even in Philly.

 

There is "officially sanctioned" behavior by organizations, then there is behavior that is unofficially allowed to persist by turning a blind eye to it. 

 

Philadelphia PD has a long history of turning a blind eye to the racist behavior of their officers.  The last thing they want is video evidence of that behavior, forcing them to confront it.  Note: The PPD is currently being sued for wrongful arrest of civilians that attempt to record their officer's behavior in public.



#24 Ccat

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 06:09 PM

Lots of good cops out there no doubt, even in Philly.

There is "officially sanctioned" behavior by organizations, then there is behavior that is unofficially allowed to persist by turning a blind eye to it.

Philadelphia PD has a long history of turning a blind eye to the racist behavior of their officers. The last thing they want is video evidence of that behavior, forcing them to confront it. Note: The PPD is currently being sued for wrongful arrest of civilians that attempt to record their officer's behavior in public.


Like I said, it's possible that PPD is that way. If so, then that needs to change. Not the way we do it around here though. We are actually encouraged to have video on ourselves, knowing that everything we do that's on our cameras is available to discoverable to the defense and/or a available to the public through FOIA

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