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Rusell Wilson, Colin Kaepernick and Cam Newton

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I expect him to work on the overthrows in the offseason. It would help if guys like Lafell didn't tip passes straight to defenders though.

 

Lafell is not that good, but you have to be fair to him.  That was a poorly thrown ball.

 

 

As for the three QB's here, they are all good.....and bad.  Just like any young QB's they have lots of work to do to get better, and be consistently dangerous.

 

 

Cam has superior talent, but less talent around him.  When we get a decent O Line, and Cam fixes his misfires, this O will be scary again.

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If Cam was behind San Frans MASSIVE O-line, as well with some decent offensive talent. We'd me neigh unstoppable. 

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your right its the receivers fault they cant jump 8 feet in the air to catch all the overthrown balls.

 

ur stupid never post again 

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If RW was taller I would have a difficult time between Cam and him. But, I like Cam's athletic build and I think it's been beneficial for him to be kept in the pocket a bit more then he was used to from prior years. Our O-Line is probably the worst of the three teams and I believe that is why Cam often gets sacked. A lot of the times the analysts criticize Cam for not stepping up into his pocket to make more accurate throws, but if our O-Line is collapsing and the right side is compromised - I don't see many options for him. Seattle's O-Line is not much better than ours, RW is often running for his life. Although, I think the difference between Seattle and us is that their OC calls for quicker plays and routes.

 

I would like to see what Cam could do with a great O-Line and some quicker plays.

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From a pure, old school QB perspective I believe Cam is the best of the three. Both Kap and Wilson have more offensive weapons and, therefore, they aren't in a position often to make something happen.

Cam, with the obvious lack of offensive options, is forced to make things happen and he often carries this team. Neither Kap nor Wilson have to carry any part of their offense.

yeah cam better in the pocket than any of them

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If RW was taller I would have a difficult time between Cam and him. But, I like Cam's athletic build and I think it's been beneficial for him to be kept in the pocket a bit more then he was used to from prior years. Our O-Line is probably the worst of the three teams and I believe that is why Cam often gets sacked. A lot of the times the analysts criticize Cam for not stepping up into his pocket to make more accurate throws, but if our O-Line is collapsing and the right side is compromised - I don't see many options for him. Seattle's O-Line is not much better than ours, RW is often running for his life. Although, I think the difference between Seattle and us is that their OC calls for quicker plays and routes.

 

I would like to see what Cam could do with a great O-Line and some quicker plays.

But he isnt though

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Seems the word if is very popular lately. Chemistry is just as important as talent. Oh and that thing called coaching. More talent doesnt always equal more wins. Ask the Lions.

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I would take Cam over those two, bar none. We might've lost on Sunday, but Cam played great in the first half and didn't play bad in the 2nd half (held the ball too long trying to make plays which led to bad sacks and threw one really bad pick when the game was already over.) I'm sold on him being able to lead this team to a title once they add young talent around him and improve their financial flexibility. San Fran and Seattle probably have the deepest and most talented rosters 1-53 in the league. The talent disparity at OL and the skill positions alone is ridiculous, which makes life a lot easier for Kaep and Wilson.

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Cam and Kap miss open receivers by miles all game long. Wilson moves the best in the pocket and has the nicest pass, but he hasn't really been relied on too frequently. Many games Seattle is happy to let it's running game and defense run the show. On the other hand Cam had two full seasons where he had the entire load put on his shoulders and broke records in the process.

 

Kap has the playoff experience and success.

 

Panthers are a worse team than Seattle and SF. If they can build on this years talent then maybe Car can reach those teams then we can see how Cam plays when he's on equal footing in terms of the things around him.

 

Seattle and SF have two of the wisest coaches in the league and have extremely talented coordinators. Carolina not so much.

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I expect him to work on the overthrows in the offseason. It would help if guys like Lafell didn't tip passes straight to defenders though.

 

They should credit Interceptions to the last offensive player that touched the ball.

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Cam and Kap miss open receivers by miles all game long. Wilson moves the best in the pocket and has the nicest pass, but he hasn't really been relied on too frequently. Many games Seattle is happy to let it's running game and defense run the show. On the other hand Cam had two full seasons where he had the entire load put on his shoulders and broke records in the process.

 

Kap has the playoff experience and success.

 

Panthers are a worse team than Seattle and SF. If they can build on this years talent then maybe Car can reach those teams then we can see how Cam plays when he's on equal footing in terms of the things around him.

 

Seattle and SF have two of the wisest coaches in the league and have extremely talented coordinators. Carolina not so much.

 

In actuality Colin Kaepernick and Russell Wilson are among the most accurate in the league when throwing deep.

http://regressing.deadspin.com/charts-who-are-the-best-deep-passers-in-the-nfl-1469917039 (as of 11/23, I don't know where he ranks now)

Charts: Who Are The Best Deep Passers In The NFL?

ku-xlarge.jpg

Deep passes are the most exciting play in televised football—the viewing audience can't see the situation downfield until the ball (and the camera) make it down there, so the play always feels, in that tiny moment before we catch up, like a sure touchdown or interception. It's well known that not every QB in the league has the ability (or proclivity) to throw a good deep ball, but we want to know: Who are best deeper passers in the NFL?

Let's look at this from a few different angles. For starters, let's look at who's actually throwing it downfield. Pro Football Focus has tracked every single passing attempt at a target 20+ yards down the field going back to 2008. The chart at the top shows, for this year's QBs (min. 150 total attempts), who's thrown deep passes the most often over the six seasons, as a percentage of total attempts. There are some surprises in there—I didn't know Jake Locker chucked it so often—but for the most part this conforms with general assumptions about who have the "strong arms" in the league. Slingers like Eli Manning and Joe Flacco are towards the top, while dink-and-dunkers like Ryan Tannehill, Christian Ponder, Alex Smith, and Matt Schaub are towards the bottom.

But who's throwing the most accurate deep throws? Pro Football Focus also tracks receiver drops, so instead of completion percentage—which knocks the QB for throws that should have been caught—we can use PFF's "accuracy" figure, which is a measurement of how many throws were on target (completions + drops over attempts):

ku-xlarge.jpg

Well that might be why I hadn't heard too much about Jake Locker—while he ranks first in the league in deep pass attempt rate, just 35.6 percent of his deep looks are on target, which puts him at 26th in the league. Russell Wilson and Colin Kaepernick have been accurate on over 50 percent of their deep throws so far in their careers, which is just absurd, joining Drew Brees at the very top (with Geno Smith and Aaron Rodgers close behind). Mike Glennon and Matt Schaub are notable in that they attempt very few deep passes, but when they do they've been very accurate. Finally, it's interesting to see that while Eli Manning has seen a lot of success with the deep ball, Joe Flacco has actually been pretty terrible.

Accuracy isn't a perfectly fair measure though; a 25-yard first down is great, but it's not as good as a 50-yard touchdown, even if that throw is harder to hit. Here's a chart of yards per attempt by QB on 20+ yard targets, still from 2008 through present:

ku-xlarge.jpg

Drew Brees takes over the top spot, thanks in no small part to the absurd downfield dominance of Jimmy Graham. Joe Flacco joins a very sad group of passers who are at least 10% below the league average, although Tom Brady, Jay Cutler, and Matt Stafford aren't far behind. The Jets face the Ravens this weekend in a critical game for the AFC playoff picture, and while a very successful deep passer will be taking the field, it probably isn't the QB you'd expect it to be.

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In actuality Colin Kaepernick and Russell Wilson are among the most accurate in the league when throwing deep.

http://regressing.deadspin.com/charts-who-are-the-best-deep-passers-in-the-nfl-1469917039 (as of 11/23, I don't know where he ranks now)

Charts: Who Are The Best Deep Passers In The NFL?

ku-xlarge.jpg

Deep passes are the most exciting play in televised football—the viewing audience can't see the situation downfield until the ball (and the camera) make it down there, so the play always feels, in that tiny moment before we catch up, like a sure touchdown or interception. It's well known that not every QB in the league has the ability (or proclivity) to throw a good deep ball, but we want to know: Who are best deeper passers in the NFL?

Let's look at this from a few different angles. For starters, let's look at who's actually throwing it downfield. Pro Football Focus has tracked every single passing attempt at a target 20+ yards down the field going back to 2008. The chart at the top shows, for this year's QBs (min. 150 total attempts), who's thrown deep passes the most often over the six seasons, as a percentage of total attempts. There are some surprises in there—I didn't know Jake Locker chucked it so often—but for the most part this conforms with general assumptions about who have the "strong arms" in the league. Slingers like Eli Manning and Joe Flacco are towards the top, while dink-and-dunkers like Ryan Tannehill, Christian Ponder, Alex Smith, and Matt Schaub are towards the bottom.

But who's throwing the most accurate deep throws? Pro Football Focus also tracks receiver drops, so instead of completion percentage—which knocks the QB for throws that should have been caught—we can use PFF's "accuracy" figure, which is a measurement of how many throws were on target (completions + drops over attempts):

ku-xlarge.jpg

Well that might be why I hadn't heard too much about Jake Locker—while he ranks first in the league in deep pass attempt rate, just 35.6 percent of his deep looks are on target, which puts him at 26th in the league. Russell Wilson and Colin Kaepernick have been accurate on over 50 percent of their deep throws so far in their careers, which is just absurd, joining Drew Brees at the very top (with Geno Smith and Aaron Rodgers close behind). Mike Glennon and Matt Schaub are notable in that they attempt very few deep passes, but when they do they've been very accurate. Finally, it's interesting to see that while Eli Manning has seen a lot of success with the deep ball, Joe Flacco has actually been pretty terrible.

Accuracy isn't a perfectly fair measure though; a 25-yard first down is great, but it's not as good as a 50-yard touchdown, even if that throw is harder to hit. Here's a chart of yards per attempt by QB on 20+ yard targets, still from 2008 through present:

ku-xlarge.jpg

Drew Brees takes over the top spot, thanks in no small part to the absurd downfield dominance of Jimmy Graham. Joe Flacco joins a very sad group of passers who are at least 10% below the league average, although Tom Brady, Jay Cutler, and Matt Stafford aren't far behind. The Jets face the Ravens this weekend in a critical game for the AFC playoff picture, and while a very successful deep passer will be taking the field, it probably isn't the QB you'd expect it to be.

 

 

 

 

Do you happen to notice that most of those qbs in the top 10, save Luck and Newton, have either a top 10 receiving corps or a running game that can open up the pass.

 

These stats are meaningless if your aren't taking a look at the personnel involved.

 

QBs throw

 

WRs catch

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