Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

"Aid in Dying" Movement: Thoughts


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 Anybodyhome

Anybodyhome

    USN Retired

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,200 posts
  • LocationWherever I May Roam

Posted 08 February 2014 - 01:17 PM

http://www.nytimes.c...ss&emc=rss&_r=0

 

DENVER — Helping the terminally ill end their lives, condemned for decades as immoral, is gaining traction. Banned everywhere but Oregon until 2008, it is now legal in five states. Its advocates, who have learned to shun the term “assisted suicide,” believe that as baby boomers watch frail parents suffer, support for what they call the “aid in dying” movement will grow further.

In January, a district court in New Mexico authorized doctors to provide lethal prescriptions and declared a constitutional right for “a competent, terminally ill patient to choose aid in dying.” Last May, the Vermont Legislature passed a law permitting it, joining Montana, Oregon and Washington. This spring, advocates are strongly promoting “death with dignity” bills in Connecticut and other states.

 

Thoughts on this subject? I'm all for this. While many people here seem to think uninsured people's use of the ER is driving up health care costs, I'd be curious to see just how keeping uninsured people alive against their wishes contributes to this as well....



#2 PhillyB

PhillyB

    hug it chug it football

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,739 posts
  • LocationGreensboro

Posted 08 February 2014 - 03:12 PM

slippery slope?



#3 teeray

teeray

    THE SWAGNIFICENT

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,859 posts

Posted 08 February 2014 - 03:55 PM

As someone who recently went through this I have to say I am in favor of this.

#4 Creepster

Creepster

    MEMBER

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 395 posts
  • LocationNot telling

Posted 08 February 2014 - 03:56 PM

Really dont see why someone has to aid someone to die if they really want to die unless that person is a para or quadraplegic.



#5 teeray

teeray

    THE SWAGNIFICENT

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,859 posts

Posted 08 February 2014 - 04:01 PM

Really dont see why someone has to aid someone to die if they really want to die unless that person is a para or quadraplegic.

My stepfather preferred to live every moment he could still talk and what have you.

Then he suffered for a week as the family stood around him and listened to him moan loudly as cancer slowly killed him.

Once he was in that state we should have had the ability to help him crossover in a more peaceful manner.

#6 teeray

teeray

    THE SWAGNIFICENT

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,859 posts

Posted 08 February 2014 - 04:04 PM

The other issue that comes to mind is life insurance policies. I believe suicide negates that, this would allow an alternative and make sure your family is still taken care of.

#7 natty

natty

    Senior Member

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,731 posts

Posted 08 February 2014 - 04:10 PM

I have no problems with it as long as people don't start killing off grannie because she's too much of a burden. 



#8 Happy Panther

Happy Panther

    Now even funnier.

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,587 posts

Posted 08 February 2014 - 08:49 PM

The other issue that comes to mind is life insurance policies. I believe suicide negates that, this would allow an alternative and make sure your family is still taken care of.

 

Nah usually suicide only negates the policy if it is the first year or so after taking out the policy.



#9 NanuqoftheNorth

NanuqoftheNorth

    Frosty Alaskan Amber

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,093 posts
  • LocationAlaska

Posted 08 February 2014 - 09:22 PM

If you are interested in this topic and have access to HBO Documentary Specials, I highly recommend you watch this one.



“In the beginning none of us wanted to do it except Mom,” he said in an interview. “Taking her own life was a very difficult decision for her, but she felt strongly that others should have the same choice. For her, it wasn’t about dying but living with dignity and not being a burden to her family.”
http://www.nytimes.c...dance.html?_r=0



#10 Jangler

Jangler

    Its gonna be just like they say, them voices tell me so

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 46,795 posts

Posted 08 February 2014 - 09:32 PM

My stepfather preferred to live every moment he could still talk and what have you.

Then he suffered for a week as the family stood around him and listened to him moan loudly as cancer slowly killed him.

Once he was in that state we should have had the ability to help him crossover in a more peaceful manner.

 

The Morphine Tap-out, that's what I called it.



#11 teeray

teeray

    THE SWAGNIFICENT

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,859 posts

Posted 08 February 2014 - 11:25 PM

Nah usually suicide only negates the policy if it is the first year or so after taking out the policy.


That may be true. I was just thinking off the top of my head.

#12 Carolina Husker

Carolina Husker

    I hate football

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,476 posts

Posted 09 February 2014 - 12:07 AM

I believe everyone should kill themself.

#13 twylyght

twylyght

    The picture of how I care

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,328 posts

Posted 09 February 2014 - 07:34 AM

If you truly believe in the sovereignty of one's life, then I don't see how one can argue against one's will to end their own so long as it is not at the expense of anyone else.



#14 intangiblejohnny

intangiblejohnny

    The Josh McRoberts of Posting

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,840 posts
  • LocationInterwebz

Posted 11 February 2014 - 12:13 AM

I believe anyone not in an altered state of consiousness should be allowed to receive Doctor assisted suicide.

This gets a little complicated when you consider the mentally ill. For instance, a severe manic depressive could feel the intense need to die one moment and then the ecstasy of life a couple of weeks later.

I strongly advocate the idea when dealing with the terminally ill, especially in severe cases of M.S.

#15 g5jamz

g5jamz

    Is back

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,138 posts

Posted 11 February 2014 - 09:59 AM

Torn on this, but as someone married to a RN (then FNP) who worked in a MICU...I understand.  "Morphine tap out", keeping them comfortable, stop feeding tube, stop getting chemo treatments, calling Hospice, etc....it's all a part of the process of dying.  When it's our time...it's our time.  Some people get shafted in the health lottery.  By the way...all the ones I mentioned are already done in every hospital in North Carolina.  It's just not put into the hands of families or unlicensed health providers. 




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Contact Us: info@carolinahuddle.com - IP Content Design by Joshua Tree / TitansReport.