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Continuing Education Advice & Career Thread

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Posted

My wife was a RN with a full ride to Wake for the PA program and came up one semester (clinicals) short due to a complicated pregnancy.

there are still accredited associates and bachelors degree PA schools around.

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Posted

That's true. If I was younger and wanted to be in the medical field I would have been an anesthesiologist. That's where the money is at, although it's very difficult to get in those schools.

 

Not to mention that the liability insurance for an anesthesiologist is ridiculously high.

 

Anyone going into the medical field should look into being a radiologist.  They made serious coin, have much less stress than most doctors, and technology has made it possible to work remotely from the hospital during the graveyard shift. 

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I have a CIS degree and could not find a job after retiring from the Air Force. Decided to follow my lifelong dream if being a teacher and am in my last semester of school. I student teach in the fall and wi graduate I'm December. Will I ever make a lot of money? Nope. But I will be doing something I have always wanted to do! I will be 45 and starting a new career and am scared to death!

 

Good luck to you my friend....you will have our future in your hands.

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Posted

I have 3 undergrad degrees and none of them have ever been mentioned in a job search/interview process. The experience of 20 years in the Navy, leading divisions of anywhere from 30-120 people and spending nearly my entire career at sea are all that I needed to get my face in front of someone. What does this mean to most? The fact is at some point your practical experience becomes the primary factor in the hiring process while the degree(s) means dick.

 

The second point I'd like to mention is once an individual decides on a career path, has the education and degree, the job hunt/hiring process starts. And one of the biggest mistakes I see when people start this entire process is they do not want to move where the jobs are. I lived for 13 years in a small Virginia town where the unemployment rate has been the highest in the state for over a decade (20+%). Do you have any idea how many families and kids I knew who went off to school at Va Tech, Radford, James Madison, UVA, etc. only to come back to Martinsville after school and end up living with Mom & Dad because they can't find work? If you're going to make the sacrifice and effort to get the necessary education for your chosen career path, don't you think planning to move to where the jobs are should be part of that process as well?

 

When I retired from the Navy, I knew I could not afford to live in San Diego any longer if I opted not to go back to work immediately following my Navy career. It was getting very crowded and expensive and I was single. I almost literally threw a dart at a map and had the Navy move me across the country to NC a year before I retired. Here I could easily afford to take my time and regroup as I learned how to live as a civilian at the age of 38. Try doing that sometime... 38 years old and literally start looking for a job for the first time in my adult life. 

 

1. Education/experience

2. Be willing to move to where the jobs are

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Posted

It helps to be incredibly handsome and charming like myself.  Gets you into so many doors.

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Posted

Not true. But math is a big part to computer science.

 

I did say programming not computer science. But this was back when C++ was cool.

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Posted

C++ is cool if you're into making video games.

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Posted

I always recommend public speaking (or interpersonal communication) classes. Joining Toastmasters really helped my wife because it forced her to speak to strangers. English is not her primary language and it provided a place where if you fumble over your words it isn't a big deal. You aren't in front of your peers at work. But you HAVE to participate. Speak, lead the table topics...etc...Her work paid for it, so I don't know the costs.

 

At team lunches, my previous Global Sales VP would drop a random topic and choose someone at lunch to speak for a full 60 seconds. Mine was philips head screws/screwdrivers. Even you don't know the topic, you need to be able to BS your way into changing the topic for a full 60 seconds. He told me afterwards, he thought about choosing "quilting" as a topic....I may have been in trouble.....I told him, next time I'll bring up the topic first and might choose the topic "Who's better, Brady vs Manning" and give it to him. He wasn't a football fan.

 

 

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Posted

I'm going on information about twenty years old. I was looking to become a programmer way back before there were women on the internet. When asking around trying to focus on what I should take in school I was always told they prefer math degrees over programming degrees. Any truth to that?

 

And become an Engineer and you can do almost anything you want except heart surgery.

 

They must have meant some kind of programming certification.  Before the early 90s I don't know of anywhere that offered a programming degree.  My first year college I was in the college of engineering and after they created the college of information technology.  

 

I never learned 'programming' though.  The intro courses taught you some c++ but you were basically expected to pick up whatever language you wanted to learn on your own.  Nothing I learned directly applies to what I do now but it was definitely worth it to learn those core concepts.  

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Posted

You could try making meth.  Worked out for Malcoms dad.  Sort of.

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Posted

So as you guys know I've been absent a lot lately. This is due to a lot of things but mostly due to going back to school, switching careers and having a family.

I thought this thread would be a good thread to have and stickied.

I'll start off first: I've been changing my mind in my career path and finishing education. I'm in the software industry but I'm an account manager and not a developer for the time being. I am finishing my degree in computer science and want to transition to a developer / programmer role. I hear the developers here don't make as much as others do in the industry.

What do you guys recommend I do?

 

just get that degree bro - I have a health degree (not a BS) but I don't work in the health field. those tech jobs seem to be good ones - I have a friend who is a web developer and he makes a pretty decent living. I just don't have the tech poo in my blood. 

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Posted

I'm trying to figure out what I could do with a two year cyber crime degree...

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