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The Case For Janoris Jenkins

Mar 27 2012 10:02 AM HeatCheck Carolina Panthers

Janoris Jenkins | 5'10" | 193 | North Alabama

N. Alabama Stats (1 year) 2 INTs, 53 tackles

Florida Stats (3 Years) 8 INTs, 121 tackles


First want to say that if Morris Claiborne falls to our #9 pick we'd be stupid not to select him. He might not be as good a cover corner but he is right up there with Janoris. That coupled along with Jenkins's past makes Mo a safer pick. But I just want to make the case for Janoris Jenkins, whether that be at #9 or if we trade down.

Janoris Jenkins's talent should never really come into question. He has always been highly touted as he was one of the top recruits coming out of high school. As a true freshman, Janoris started from day 1 at CB. He was just the second true freshman to do that at the University of Florida. While in Gainesville he was a part of some great defenses. He even shared the field with Joe Haden. Anybody who watched Gator games would know that that was one of the best CB tandem in all of college football. But if you had to grade them separately, Janoris always seemed a couple notches above. Haden was the better athlete and had great ball skills. But Jenkins was the better cover corner and was able to limit the throws to his side of the field. The Browns now have their CB for the future in Haden and we could do the same with Jenkins.

I know many are wary of Jenkins's past and rightfully so. He has been caught multiple times for marijuana and was kicked off UF's football team heading into his senior season. Personally, I think this was one of the best things that could have happened to Janoris. It gave Janoris a new perspective on his situation, "It humbled me a lot seeing how I went from Florida to a Division II football school in one season. It really humbled me as a kid. It taught me a lot. The environment was totally different, from 95,000 in "The Swamp" to 3,500 at UNA. Big difference." This humbling experience matured him and allowed him to see how his decision making can affect him on the football field. Going from the SEC to division II, Jenkins realized the spotlight wasn't nearly as big. Jenkins never failed a drug test at UNA according to Bowden and has kept his nose clean off the football field.

Why It Makes Sense for the Panthers?
I think most could argue that CB is the one position that needs to be upgraded the most. If not the top need, it's 1b. Besides Gamble, our CBs are hardly reliable. Adding a CB that can actually cover to go alongside Gamble will ease our safeties. I feel like playing safety on a team that can't defend the pass or the run has to be a tough task. Not knowing whether to shade a certain side of the field to defend the pass or coming up in the box to stop the run seemed like a constant dilemma for our safeties. Jenkins would be the first step in making this a more complete defense.

I think many would agree that this years draft class is deep in the CB department but that doesn't mean there isn't a drop off in terms of talent.

Personal Scouting Report
First, I will begin with the negatives for Jenkins. I'll start with the obvious character concern. As many know, Jenkins played at UNA this year because he was no longer a part of the UF football team after multiple violations. Many have cited this reason alone for wanting nothing to do with him. As far as on the field weaknesses, there is really only one glaring concern and that is his size. I think his size, or lack thereof, is more of a concern in run support than in the pass game.

If you can get past his character concerns, it's easy to see that Jenkins is a stud CB. Addressing his history of bad decision making, I truly think that his time at Division II matured him. If he can keep his nose clean he will be a great CB. He does lack size but that didn't seem like a problem for him when defending the top receivers in the SEC. He has good leaping ability. He is very agile and has fluid hips that allows him to change direction even while reacting to the wideout. And even on the rare occasion that there is a sizable separation, Jenkins is able to cover ground with his speed. He is the best cover corner in this years draft because of his ability to shut down and truly limit one side of the field. Concerning run support, Janoris has great instincts. He is very aggressive and is able to stop the back before he can make his move. But because of his size he is not always able to make the tackle. But the fact that he can get there with great speed, he can at least slow things down so the linebackers can clean up the mess.


Most have seen his work at UF but here are Highlights from UNA


I understand the people that want to stay away from him because of his past. But what I can't understand are the people that are able to overlook the character concerns but are suggesting CBs (not named Claiborne) over Janoris. As far as just talent and production, he is in the debate for the #1 CB in the draft.

I think the positives outweigh the negatives and truly feel he has matured from his time at UNA. He is saying all the right things and has taken ownership of his mistakes in his interviews. This is much better than placing the blame somewhere else or trying to find excuses. Admitting your mistakes is the first step in the process of changing as a person. And that is what I see from for Janoris Jenkins.

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111 Comments

:: before


Wait long enough, I have little doubt you will have a real case to defend.
Wait long enough, I have little doubt you will have a real case to defend.
Tell me....What did Jenkins probably say to coaches after his first drug bust? What is he saying now? HINT: The same damn things. If you think going undergound to a FCS (I AA) school cured him enough to invest a high pick on him-you are dumb.

Yes, RR can contol him. Shouldn't Rivera be spending his time doing other things? You folks act like we are running a day care-rehab service. Not worth it. In my experience, people on drugs will lie and let you down. EVERY TIME.
Jenkins is cured!! I know because he played a year of small college ball and was not busted again.
--Mr Gullible
So, in your opinion, EVERY person who has smoked weed is forever a bad person? Losing a D-1 scholarship, being kicked off your team, and losing the spotlight as a star football player can be a humbling experience that you will never live through. To automatically write him off based on his past is ignorant and you are the dumb one.

Man, you'd think people would learn this when looking at Cam. Yeah, he didn't smoke weed but he was screwing up and did so multiple times, which is why he was kicked off the team. People wrote him off and said he wasn't mature, could never be a leader, and was an arrogant kid with a fake smile and no work ethic despite his coaches and new teammates saying otherwise. Tell me, how correct was that observation?

I'm not saying there is a guarantee that Jenkins has changed. But he should be given the opportunity to come in and talk with JR and Rivera. The kid's talent is unreal and it'd be stupid to write him off without giving him a chance to prove himself.

So, in your opinion, EVERY person who has smoked weed is forever a bad person? Losing a D-1 scholarship, being kicked off your team, and losing the spotlight as a star football player can be a humbling experience that you will never live through. To automatically write him off based on his past is ignorant and you are the dumb one.


If you are at one of the biggest programs in college football, are considered the absolute best player at your position in the nation, are a guaranteed top-10 pick, and have everything going for you where you are and you still choose to do things that risk your career, this raises some red flags. Sure, people can change. But JJ gave a lot away just to light up.

The question is what will he do with all the money, free time, "friends", and spotlight when he is drafted?

If you are at one of the biggest programs in college football, are considered the absolute best player at your position in the nation, are a guaranteed top-10 pick, and have everything going for you where you are and you still choose to do things that risk your career, this raises some red flags. Sure, people can change. But JJ gave a lot away just to light up.

The question is what will he do with all the money, free time, "friends", and spotlight when he is drafted?


In my opinion, the guy thought he was invincible. Like you said, he was the best player on one of the best teams in the country. Had everything handed to him and was basically guaranteed an NFL career. In his mind, he could do whatever he wanted because the team needed him. However, he should know by now that people won't put up with that crap and they will dismiss you from their team. I'd hope that he got a glimpse of reality and saw that everything can be taken away for his mistakes.

In my opinion, the guy thought he was invincible. Like you said, he was the best player on one of the best teams in the country. Had everything handed to him and was basically guaranteed an NFL career. In his mind, he could do whatever he wanted because the team needed him. However, he should know by now that people won't put up with that crap and they will dismiss you from their team. He got a glimpse that everything can be taken away for his mistakes.


I agree. This kind of situation can definitely have that impact on someone. It's just a hard judgment call for an NFL executive to pay someone that much money based on hope that the player has changed. Whoever takes him needs to ask the team leader and the leader on defense to take him under their wing. He needs to be closely monitored for a while.



That last return was my highschool field.

If the risk isn't the talent then you must be hung up on the character concern. So why is the risk worth it just one round below?


Just one round makes all the difference. You see a big dropoff in salary between the #9 overall and the #40 overall picks. You don't spend a Top 10 pick on a guy with character concerns. You need that Top 10 pick to be as sure-fire as possible. Not just on the football field, but in the community, and you don't want this guy getting suspended for off-field issues.
I am sure he won't be the top player on our board at #9.

You don't spend a Top 10 pick on a guy with character concerns.


I hate to keep repeating this, but didn't we have this same debate last year?
You guys make it seem as if we're just going to draft Janoris and hope everything works out by chance. The coaches' main goal is to teach these players football, but if that is all they can teach they're going to be stuck with a bunch of lazy kids that don't understand the significance and the honor of playing in the NFL. There's a lot more to entering the league than learning a playbook. You gotta remember these are all kids. They don't have no jobs. They don't have no responsibility outside of playing glorified high school football and getting good grades in all their classes. They're not going to instantly mature the second they get handed a contract to sign. It's the coaches job to make sure that these kids are prepared physically AND mentally. When you think about it, the maturity of every player in the draft and their potential to advance should be questioned, not just players that have been caught smoking weed. I, for one, have faith in coach Rivera and his staff to be able whip this kid into shape on the field and in his own head.

fun scenario: trade down, get Janoris late in the 1st, get Jerel Worthy in the 2nd, get Super Bowl in the 2nd

Tell me....What did Jenkins probably say to coaches after his first drug bust? What is he saying now? HINT: The same damn things. If you think going undergound to a FCS (I AA) school cured him enough to invest a high pick on him-you are dumb.

Yes, RR can contol him. Shouldn't Rivera be spending his time doing other things? You folks act like we are running a day care-rehab service. Not worth it. In my experience, people on drugs will lie and let you down. EVERY TIME.


I am dumb because I think going to a Division II team (not FCS like you say) humbles someone. This is the first time I have heard Janoris say, "I'm done with marijuana forever. I can't do it, man."
we better nail this "top 10" pick ............because it will be our last one for quite so time.

we'll be picking in the 20's from here on out.

I am dumb because I think going to a Division II team (not FCS like you say) humbles someone. This is the first time I have heard Janoris say, "I'm down with marijuana forever. I can't do it, man."


He did not go to a Division II school as a humbing experience....he went there because he would not have to sit out a year. That decision was made solely for his own benefit.

This is the first time I have heard Janoris say, "I'm down with marijuana forever. I can't do it, man."


I do hope he's not down with marijuana forever.

He did not go to a Division II school as a humbing experience....he went there because he would not have to sit out a year. That decision was made solely for his own benefit.


What? I realize why he went there, he wanted to play. But I am saying the aftereffect was an humbling experience.

I do hope he's not down with marijuana forever.


Oops. Edited now. Must have autocorrected or something.

It is when it's the difference between millions of dollars and an NFL career.


Its proven that Money does not make you be a better person or does it help stop drug problems.

He hasn't had a positive test at Northern Alabama and has had no off field issues. People can change. Saying there's no way he can stop smoking weed is just stupid. And let's be real, smoking weed does not make you a bad person. He has done all he can to prove he's changed and has shown maturity since his departure from Florida.


For a kid to fail a Collage drug test the first time he's not too smart or is an addict. Most every school knows when the test or going to happen and have time to prepare there players. Most NFL teams know players smoke weed and many have failed the combine test but there is a difference between recreational use and not being able to stop. Clearly his was of the latter.

I know the circumstances are a little different, but how many people on this board said picking Cam would be a mistake due to his off-field issues? After Cam was dismissed from Florida, he matured and grew as person. And from what I've read, Jenkins has done the same.


Cams situation was totally different and he never had any drug related problems. Comparing him to Cam is like apples to oranges.
So if you think a lot college and pro players smoke weed and just do a better job of hiding it, why does it matter if Jenkins smokes? Do you know specifically that Florida was aware of the upcoming tests in time to tell Jenkins to stop? And do you actually think NFL coaches are ok with their players smoking weed?
A lot of people have speculated that if Muschamp wasn't the head coach he would have stayed on the team. Not saying people wouldn't have had questions over his character but the whole getting kicked off the team highlighted it a bit more.

Cams situation was totally different and he never had any drug related problems. Comparing him to Cam is like apples to oranges.


Cam never had any drug problems, but both players were punished for off-field issues. Cam was labeled as a trouble-maker with character concerns; someone who was immature and could not be trusted with the #1 pick. The same argument is being made against Jenkins (as a top 10 pick).

Tell me....What did Jenkins probably say to coaches after his first drug bust? What is he saying now? HINT: The same damn things. If you think going undergound to a FCS (I AA) school cured him enough to invest a high pick on him-you are dumb.

Yes, RR can contol him. Shouldn't Rivera be spending his time doing other things? You folks act like we are running a day care-rehab service. Not worth it. In my experience, people on drugs will lie and let you down. EVERY TIME.


Cured him? You do know that marijuana causes no physical or chemical addictions. I know plenty of regular marijuana users, some of them are unreliable people and also do real drugs as well (cocaine, narcotics, excessive alcohol abuse, etc). About half of them however, are very reliable and good people that provide for society. They have successful careers in technology, law and financial services to name a few. They also have families that they care for, provide for and protect.

Fact of the matter is that people are still people. You can point a single aspect of an individual and immediately assume that everyone who possesses that aspect are identical, or you can be realistic and see that some people, despite what they do in their spare time, are good and some are assholes.
Some of you people love to cherry pick and ignore the glaring facts about people.
The only "glaring fact" is that he smoked weed. Some people are ignorant and just assume that makes him a bad person for the rest of his life.
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