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rodeo

ABCB is the only rhyme scheme

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15 hours ago, pantherphan96 said:

financial literacy is code for either the awareness to avoid poverty by those fortunate enough to not already be stuck in it, or the willingness to exploit others for personal gain.

They should know better. It's not my fault they don't know how to manage their money. If they knew how to manage their money I wouldn't be able to pay them as little or charge them as much. This is just a way of teaching them a lesson. Let's call it compassionate educational captialism.

 

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just searching the word covfefe on twitter will replenish all of the missing pages immediately

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jim ross on aew tonight just said (about a japanese woman with a Queen gimmick) "Freddy Mercury never looked so oriental! Erm Asian, erm female."

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thanksgiving is a good day to start the wretched of the earth imo

from the preface (sartre):

Quote

“In short, the Third World discovers itself and speaks to itself through this voice. We know it is not a uniform world, and it still contains subjected peoples, some of whom have acquired a false independence, others who are fighting to conquer their sovereignty, and yet others who have won their freedom, but who live under the constant threat of imperialist aggression. These differences are born out of colonial history, in other words, oppression. In some places the metropolis makes do with paying a clique of feudal overlords; in others, it has fabricated a fake bourgeoisie of colonized subjects in a system of divide and rule; elsewhere, it has killed two birds with one stone: the colony is both settlement and exploitation. Europe, therefore, has hardened the divisions and conflicts, forged classes, and in some cases, racism, and endeavored by every means to generate and deepen the stratification of colonized societies. Fanon hides nothing. In order to wage the struggle against us, the former colony must wage a struggle against itself. Or rather it is one and the same thing. In the heat of combat, all domestic barriers must be torn down, the powerless bourgeoisie of racketeers and compradores, the still privileged urban proletariat and the lumpenproletariat of the shanty towns, must all align with the positions of the rural masses, the true reservoir for the national and revolutionary army. In countries where colonialism has deliberately halted development, the peasantry, when it decides to revolt, very quickly emerges as the radical class. It is all too familiar with naked oppression, suffers far worse than the urban workers, and to prevent it from dying of hunger, nothing less will do than the demolition of every existing structure. If it triumphs, the national revolution will be socialist; if it is stopped in its momentum, if the colonized bourgeoisie takes over power, the new state, despite its official sovereignty, will remain in the hands of the imperialists. The case of Katanga illustrates this fairly well. The unity of the Third World, therefore, is not complete: it is a work in progress that begins with all the colonized in every pre- or post-independent country, united under the leadership of the peasant class. This is what Fanon explains to his brothers in Africa, Asia, and Latin America: we shall achieve revolutionary socialism everywhere and all together or we shall be beaten one by one by our former tyrants. He hides nothing: neither the weaknesses nor the disagreements nor the mystification. In some places the government gets off to a bad start; in others, after a stunning success, it loses momentum; elsewhere, it has come to a halt. In order to revive it the peasants must drive their bourgeoisie into the ocean. The reader is sharply warned of the most dangerous types of alienation: the leader, the personality cult, Western culture, and equally so, the revival of African culture from a distant past. The true culture is the revolution, meaning it is forged while the iron is hot. Fanon speaks out loud and clear. We Europeans, we can hear him. The proof is you are holding this book. Isn’t he afraid that the colonial powers will take advantage of his sincerity?
No. He is not afraid of anything. Our methods are outdated: they can sometimes delay emancipation, but they can’t stop it.”

 

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I don't believe the pilgrims sat with Indians for a feast
A self-proclaimed holy sailor doesn't break bread with his beast
But then again he had a musket and the Indian had a knife
And the musket man could make him eat for life
I don't believe this country's manifestering destiny
Someone just cooked it up and it is fed to you and me
They tell us who to love and war and never ask for help
And they cannot stand us thinking for ourselves

 

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18 hours ago, SZ James (banned) said:

:thinking:

 

...

...

Somebody at War Thunder watches entirely too much pornhub.

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