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Trump Wants to Deport Vietnam Refugees

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https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2018/12/donald-trump-deport-vietnam-war-refugees/577993/

The Trump administration is resuming its efforts to deport certain protected Vietnamese immigrants who have lived in the United States for decades—many of them having fled the country during the Vietnam War.

This is the latest move in the president’s long record of prioritizing harsh immigration and asylum restrictions, and one that’s sure to raise eyebrows—the White House had hesitantly backed off the plan in August before reversing course. In essence, the administration has now decided that Vietnamese immigrants who arrived in the country before the establishment of diplomatic ties between the United States and Vietnam are subject to standard immigration law—meaning they are all eligible for deportation.

The new stance mirrors White House efforts to clamp down on immigration writ large, a frequent complaint of the president’s on the campaign trail and one he links to a litany of ills in the United States.

The administration last year began pursuing the deportation of many long-term immigrants from Vietnam, Cambodia, and other countries who the administration alleges are “violent criminal aliens.” But Washington and Hanoi have a unique 2008 agreement that specifically bars the deportation of Vietnamese people who arrived in the United States before July 12, 1995—the date the two former foes reestablished diplomatic relations following the Vietnam War.

The White House unilaterally reinterpreted the agreement in the spring of 2017 to exempt people convicted of crimes from its protections, allowing the administration to send back a small number of pre-1995 Vietnamese immigrants, a policy it retreated from this past August. Last week, however, James Thrower, a spokesperson for the U.S. embassy in Hanoi, said the American government was again reversing course.

Washington now believes that the 2008 agreement fails to protect pre-1995 Vietnamese immigrants from deportation, Thrower told The Atlantic.

“The United States and Vietnam signed a bilateral agreement on removals in 2008 that establishes procedures for deporting Vietnamese citizens who arrived in the United States after July 12, 1995, and are subject to final orders of removal,” Thrower said. “While the procedures associated with this specific agreement do not apply to Vietnamese citizens who arrived in the United States before July 12, 1995, it does not explicitly preclude the removal of pre-1995 cases.”

The about-turn came as a State Department spokesperson confirmed that the Department of Homeland Security had met with representatives of the Vietnamese embassy in Washington, D.C., but declined to provide details of when the talks took place or what was discussed.

“Forty-three years ago, a lot of the Southeast Asian communities and Vietnamese communities fled their countries and their homeland due to the war, which the U.S. was involved in, fleeing for their safety and the safety of their families,” said Kevin Lam, the organizing director of the Asian American Resource Workshop, an advocacy group. “The U.S. would do well to remember that.”

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For those of you too young to remember, the United States assisted thousands of Vietnam citizens, a lot of them Montagnards who fought the Communist North Vietnamese Army and were advisors to the US military. We put them on airplanes, helicopters and ships and flew many of them into Travis Air Force Base, near Sacramento. They most certainly would have been imprisoned or, even worse, executed had they stayed in country.

 

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The few people that I have met that got into the US this way are the most interesting, hardest working and engaged people I have ever met.

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From the article, it sounds like they're only trying to deport criminals and those who never naturalized. I can still see the problem with that, but that's exactly what centrists will point to when defending the policy or shrugging their shoulders. Anyone who naturalized is exempt from this. 

My family taught English to Montagnard families back in the 90's and helped them acclimate to life here in the States. Great, warm people. 

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7 hours ago, cookinwithgas said:

The few people that I have met that got into the US this way are the most interesting, hardest working and engaged people I have ever met.

I have found them to be no different than any other folks I meet who have a specific country of origin.  Some of them are hard working, some are lazy as fug, and some of them are just normal folks, like anyone else - neither lazy nor unusually driven.

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9 hours ago, cookinwithgas said:

The few people that I have met that got into the US this way are the most interesting, hardest working and engaged people I have ever met.

You know they appreciate it more than the little cul d sac cocksuckers running around here.

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The guy I knew best from these folks owned a small Asian restaurant in Matthews that I used to eat lunch at with my coworkers a lot back in the late 90s. He just worked behind that wok all day and man was he good at it. He ended up selling that place and getting into real estate, kids got sent to good colleges, etc. - he was the American dream embodied as far as I was concerned. He had to escape a reeducation camp, slog through the jungle for a week barefoot to get to his family, secretly leave their village and get them on a refugee boat that they had to sink so that they would be "rescued" by a British destroyer, and eventually got taken to the States.

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5 minutes ago, cookinwithgas said:

The guy I knew best from these folks owned a small Asian restaurant in Matthews that I used to eat lunch at with my coworkers a lot back in the late 90s. He just worked behind that wok all day and man was he good at it. He ended up selling that place and getting into real estate, kids got sent to good colleges, etc. - he was the American dream embodied as far as I was concerned. He had to escape a reeducation camp, slog through the jungle for a week barefoot to get to his family, secretly leave their village and get them on a refugee boat that they had to sink so that they would be "rescued" by a British destroyer, and eventually got taken to the States.

If they mess with my little Pho spot... 

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Oh it was a terrible day we found out he was selling. The place turned into a crappy little takeout joint no one was interested in overnight without him.

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On 12/13/2018 at 9:23 AM, PanthersBigD said:

From the article, it sounds like they're only trying to deport criminals and those who never naturalized. I can still see the problem with that, but that's exactly what centrists will point to when defending the policy or shrugging their shoulders. Anyone who naturalized is exempt from this. 

My family taught English to Montagnard families back in the 90's and helped them acclimate to life here in the States. Great, warm people. 

They don’t do it with Cubans 

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