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Captroop

Second mass shooting in less than 24 hours: 9 dead in Dayton

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https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/05/us/connor-betts-dayton-shooting-profile/index.html

 

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A Twitter account that appears to belong to Dayton mass shooter Connor Bettsretweeted extreme left-wing and anti-police posts, as well as tweets supporting Antifa, or anti-fascist, protesters.

The most recent tweet on the @iamthespookster account was on August 3, the day of the shooting, when he retweeted a post saying, "Millenials have a message for the Joe Biden generation: hurry up and die." He also retweeted messages supporting Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.
The user's Twitter bio reads: "he/him / anime fan / metalhead / leftist / I'm going to hell and I'm not coming back." One tweet used the hashtag #HailSatan.
 
Police are still trying to determine what motivated Betts to kill nine people early Sunday morning in a popular nightlife district in downtown Dayton. He was killed by police officers on patrol nearby 30 seconds after he opened fire.
 
In the hours before the Dayton shooting, the Twitter account "liked" several tweets about a shooting in El Paso, Texas, that left 22 dead, including one supporting gun control and others that called the El Paso shooting suspect a "terrorist," and a "white supremacist."

 

 
 
How does one like tweets supporting gun control and then go nuts.  

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It's almost like... he was mentally ill and his motivations for doing what he did made no sense at all.  Too bad he wasn't kind enough to leave behind a right wing screed that you could mistake for a Trump rally speech so we know exactly why he did it.

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1 hour ago, g5jamz said:

https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/05/us/connor-betts-dayton-shooting-profile/index.html

 

 
 
How does one like tweets supporting gun control and then go nuts.  

Perhaps wanting gun control and having a kill list are at odds with each other?

 

 

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Betts was also in a “Pornogrind” Band that, according to Vice News, “released songs about raping and killing women.” Vice called it the “extreme metal music scene.” The bands he performed in sometimes were called Menstrual Munchies and Putrid Liquid, and the songs contained vile names like “6 Ways of Female Butchery” and “Preeteen Daughter Pu$$y Slaughter,” Vice reported.

A woman he briefly dated, Caitlyn “Adelia” Johnson, told The Toledo Blade that he took her to gun ranges and showed her body camera video footage from a mass shooting, causing her to break off the relationship by text message. She also told the newspaper that Betts confided that he was bipolar and had Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

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The woman he briefly dated also told The Toledo Blade that Betts had bragged that he knew a lot about mass shootings. She shared a text message exchange with the newspaper, in which she asked, “Do you know tragedies from every city?”

“A fair bit of them! :D [smiley face],” he responded. She told the newspaper he was charming and outgoing, but said he told her he had put a gun in his mouth before and he once called her drunk and said he wanted “to hurt a bunch of people.”

In high school, Betts may have been suspended for drawing up a hit list on the bathroom wall, according to WCPO-TV. Chris Baker, the former principal, told the Journal-News, “I would not dispute that information, but I don’t want to get involved any more than just making that comment.” Bellbrook police said they are treating the Betts’ family as victims.

https://heavy.com/news/2019/08/connor-betts/

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Video game excuse is a joke. Watch the latest Real Sports segment about video gaming in South Korea...

https://www.thoughtco.com/south-korea-computer-gaming-culture-1434484

South Korea is a country infatuated with video games. It is a place where professional gamers earn six-figure contracts, date supermodels, and are treated as A-list celebrities. Cyber competitions are nationally televised and they fill-up stadiums. In this country, gaming is not just a hobby; it’s a way of life.

Although the per capita access to broadband internet is high, most Koreans actually conduct their gaming activities outside of the home in local gaming rooms called “PC bangs.” A bang is simply a LAN (local area network) gaming center where patrons pay an hourly fee to play multiplayer games. Most bangs are cheap, ranging from $1.00 to $1.50 USD an hour. There are currently over 20,000 active PC bangs in South Korea and they have become an integral part of the country’s social fabric and cultural landscape. In Korea, going to a bang is equivalent to going to the movies or the bar in the West. They are especially prevalent in big cities like Seoul, where heightened population density and the lack of space offers residents few options for recreational and social interaction.

The video game industry makes up a large share of South Korea’s GDP. According to the Ministry of Culture, in 2008 the online-gaming industry earned $1.1 billion dollars in exports. Nexon and NCSOFT, South Korea’s two largest game development companies reported a combined net income of over $370 million in 2012. The entire game market is estimated at approximately $5 billion dollars annually, or about $100 per resident, which is more than three times what Americans spend. Games like StarCraft have sold over 4.5 million copies in South Korea, out of a worldwide total of 11 million. Video games also stimulate the country’s informal economy, as millions of dollars are traded yearly through illegal gambling and betting on game matches.

In South Korea, cyber competition is considered a national sport and numerous television channels broadcast video game matches regularly. The country even has two full-time video game television networks: Ongamenet and MBC Game. According to the Federal Game Institute, 10 million South Koreans regularly follow eSports, as they are known. Depending on the matches, some video game tournaments may garner more ratings than pro baseball, soccer, and basketball combined. There are currently 10 professional gaming leagues in the country and they are all sponsored by big corporations such as SK Telecom and Samsung. The monetary rewards for winning a league tournament are colossal. Some of South Korea’s most famous players like the StarCraft legend, Yo Hwan-lim could earn more than $400,000 a year just from league matches and sponsorships. The popularity eSports has even led to the creation of the World Cyber Games.
 
Over the past decade, the Korean government has spent millions of dollars on clinics, campaigns, and programs to minimize this problem. There are now publicly funded treatment centers for game addicts. Hospitals and clinics have installed programs that specialize in treating the disease. Some Korean game companies such as NCsoft also finances private counseling centers and hotlines. In late 2011, the government took a stern step further by imposing a “Cinderella Law” (also called the Shutdown Law), which prevents anyone under the age of 16 from playing online games on their PCs, handheld device, or at a PC bang from midnight until 6 a.m. Minors are required to register their national identification cards online so that they can be monitored and regulated.
 
This law has been highly controversial and is contested by the majority of the general public, video game companies, and game associations. Many people argue that this law infringes on their liberty and would yield no positive results. Minors could just register using someone else’s identification or completely circumvent the ban by connecting to Western servers instead. Although by doing so, it certainly affirms one’s addiction.
 

 

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@Anybodyhome as I said previously SK is not the best analogy for gun violence. Because civilians don’t have guns, police barely carry them and EVERYONE goes to basic training and serves in the military. Which brings the issue back to the elephant in the room. The guns, the laws and the easy accessibility in America to acquire weapons of war. 

Video games as a whole do not attribute to gun violence. I feel “realistic” FPS’s desensitize people that play them for hours on end, day after day. If anyone here has ever spent time in a ingame chat. You know there’s crazies out there. 

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Just now, The NFL Shield At Midfield said:

I always thought RTS games were king in South Korea anyway.  Maybe that's just a stereotype, idk.

Competitive MMO’s. RTS were for a long time, “How fast can you click!”.

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13 minutes ago, Harbingers said:

@Anybodyhome as I said previously SK is not the best analogy for gun violence. Because civilians don’t have guns, police barely carry them and EVERYONE goes to basic training and serves in the military. Which brings the issue back to the elephant in the room. The guns, the laws and the easy accessibility in America to acquire weapons of war. 

Video games as a whole do not attribute to gun violence. I feel “realistic” FPS’s desensitize people that play them for hours on end, day after day. If anyone here has ever spent time in a ingame chat. You know there’s crazies out there. 

You could pretty much take any modern country that plays video games though and none are as violent as we are.     

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11 minutes ago, Harbingers said:

Competitive MMO’s. RTS were for a long time, “How fast can you click!”.

Actually PUBG is one of the most, if not THE, most played game in South Korea right now.    A shooter, so yeah.     LoL is up there as well obviously.   

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1 hour ago, g5jamz said:

How does one like tweets supporting gun control and then go nuts.  

By all indications the Ohio shooter had emotional/mental issues long (years/decades?) before his killing spree last weekend.

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3 minutes ago, NanuqoftheNorth said:

By all indications the Ohio shooter had emotional/mental issues long (years/decades?) before his killing spree last weekend.

Oh I understand that, but it seems just baffling how within a day you're "liking" anti-gun tweets, then going on a spree.  Issues indeed.  

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https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2015/05/bernie-sanders-on-guns-vermont-independent-voted-against-gun-control-for-plcaa.html

“if you passed the strongest gun control legislation tomorrow, I don’t think it will have a profound effect on the tragedies we have seen.” 

 -Bernie Sanders after Sandy Hook 

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3 minutes ago, g5jamz said:

Oh I understand that, but it seems just baffling how within a day you're "liking" anti-gun tweets, then going on a spree.  Issues indeed.  

If the reports we are now seeing are even half accurate, the Ohio shooter shouldn't have ever been allowed access to firearms. 

Unfortunately, in our society access to guns takes priority over access to healthcare.

 

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