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6 minutes ago, LinvilleGorge said:

It's why I don't really buy the Jets sticking with him. If the right QB is there, I think they draft him. But maybe sticking with Darnold is an option if the right QB isn't there.

Or... then again, maybe Gase really is just THAT atrocious. If Darnold bounces back to prove to be a quality starting QB, Gase should probably never work in football again.

Stafford being on that list doesn't make me too happy either if we are really considering him.  If a QB doesn't play well under the best situation (clean pocket) he has to bare some of the responsibility of not playing well and isn't all the coaches' fault.

Expecting a QB to be something(better) that he hasn't been in the past is how in ended up with Teddy. 

We need to quit trying to find the bargains.  Either go after Watson or draft one in the first round (trade up if needed).

 

 

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1 hour ago, AU-panther said:

 

Its easy to make excuses for him since he plays for Jets, and to blame the coaching and players around him, but stats like this make me nervous.

 

What round were the bottom 4 drafted in?  I can't recall.

 

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Just like everything depends on the price. I will say this, I was competly done with Dave when he picked a RB over Sam, I thought sam would have played better. That one year contract makes this not worth more than a late rounder, imo. Im also a sucker for low risk, high reward deals and this is one of them. 

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1 hour ago, AU-panther said:

 

Its easy to make excuses for him since he plays for Jets, and to blame the coaching and players around him, but stats like this make me nervous.

 

His starting RB was a 37 year old Gore who was lost consistently good back in 2014. Chris Herndon was his starting TE and his starting WRs were Crowder, Perriman and Berrios. Most of those guys missed a handful of games and while some may remember a breaking out Crowder, his 3 WRs have played for 8 teams now in 15 combined years in the league. 847 yards is the best any of those guys have done with 10 of 15 years below 700 yards, most much lower.

When Crowder, who played 12 games, is by far you best offensive weapon, that’s not good. Especially when your D is terrible and gives up 29 points per game. Those weapons aren’t helping when the other teams knows you have to pass to stay in every game.

Again, he hasn’t looked good but like Tannehill, was Darnold even given a chance to succeed? If we don’t love a QB at 8 and can’t land Watson, I’d be all for grabbing Trubisky and Darnold, dump Teddy and see what they can do. I’d rather we find the QB we think is a future star, but who knows how the draft and Watson will play out.

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10 minutes ago, SmokinwithWilly said:

The Gase factor cannot be underestimated. I'm not sure how long it would take to undo any damage done, but he is an interesting option for the right price. I wouldn't give up 8 for him tho. 

Lol, 8 NFW. If the Jets get Watson they’ll release Darnold or give him up for a Day 3 pick. He’s not going to even get close to what Rosen did (2nd, but Miami was getting extra picks) because Rosen didn’t have 3 years of tape. Tannehill was gotten for a future 4th and a 7th while the Titans got back a 6th. Basically it was like the Titans dropped down one round to a 6th and gave up their 7th. That’s what Darnold will likely fetch. Trubisky would probably get a 3rd. Rosen was a bad trade, one teams would look at as an example of a bad trade for a not wanted former 1st round QB.

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3 hours ago, AU-panther said:

 

Its easy to make excuses for him since he plays for Jets, and to blame the coaching and players around him, but stats like this make me nervous.

 

Matt Stafford on the wrong end of that list also. 

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4 hours ago, AU-panther said:

 

Its easy to make excuses for him since he plays for Jets, and to blame the coaching and players around him, but stats like this make me nervous.

 

 

 

Having a clean pocket doesn't mean he has wide open receivers, you could have a clean pocket and have your receivers blanketed really well. This graphic doesn't really tell the full story in my opinion. 

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16 minutes ago, Jon Snow said:

Would you trade Teddy and a 5th for Darnold?  I would be tempted just to dump that contract.

The problem is we are all going on the theory that the Jets get Watson.....they aren't going to want an albatross of a contract that Teddy brings! 

We are talking about the Jets though!  🤣

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