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Panthers Wednesday training camp thread


Zod
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17 hours ago, Khaki Lackey said:

I hate to disrupt the echo chamber, but by all accounts, the players really like Rhule.

I mean, I think people like Sam Darnold.   I think that kind of blurs the discussion.  Thinking someone is a good or likeable human doesn't mean they believe in them at job X. 

There was reporting last year by The Athletic that people were growing sour on Rhule the HC.  So by all accounts, the players aren't all in on Rhule the HC. 

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42 minutes ago, ellis said:

RA will benefit from getting back into the shallow cross/hitch/pivot route game within 5-7y of the LOS. Teddy fed him a ton of WCO-ish targets in ‘20, and the RAC production was quite good. 

On occasion, peppered into a 3rdQ situation in which Carolina has established a viable run game, you‘ll see Ben dial up some 2-man route shot concepts, as he did in practice Tuesday when Baker hit Robbie on that 35+ y post off PA.

From GB’s pass game install in 2012 (McAdoo was part of this install) 

 

 

 

A1577055-642B-4F1A-9704-156B376596CB.jpeg

Makes sense, though I'm admittedly a little iffy when it comes to Anderson on crossing routes because of how thin he is. I think we saw him "alligator arm" one or two also last season.

Curious, where'd you get the play sheet? I've seen a bunch of things like that posted from Honest NFL (good stuff)

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2 minutes ago, Mr. Scot said:

Makes sense, though I'm admittedly a little iffy when it comes to Anderson on crossing routes because of how thin he is. I think we saw him "alligator arm" one or two also last season.

Curious, where'd you get the play sheet? I've seen a bunch of things like that posted from Honest NFL (good stuff)

Honest is a good guy. He’s one of several guys out there I’ve been able to network with off-line and trade some ideas and concepts with

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1 minute ago, ellis said:

Honest is a good guy. He’s one of several guys out there I’ve been able to network with off-line and trade some ideas and concepts with

Agreed, though I suspect there aren't many casual Twitter users willing to dig through a dozen pages of run concepts 😄

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22 minutes ago, Mr. Scot said:

Agreed, though I suspect there aren't many casual Twitter users willing to dig through a dozen pages of run concepts 😄

Yeah, it takes a little bit of commitment to actually sit down and work through it. I love it, been doing it for years, and it’s highly instructive…gives me greater appreciation for the process when I watch practices and games.

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By the way, some of you may have come across this in the past, but if you haven’t… Here’s the 2005 Carolina Panthers offensive playbook. Plenty of pages on situational football, positional fundamentals, and much more. If you are a football junkie, and you remember those days here, it’s a pretty compelling piece of literature.  

A few months ago, I spoke with Keary Colbert and Deshaun Foster. They couldn’t emphasize this enough: Jim Skipper was the brain child behind most of the clock management/situational football elements within this book. 

https://second-effort.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/2005-Carolina-Panthers-Offense.pdf

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3 minutes ago, ellis said:

By the way, some of you may have come across this in the past, but if you haven’t… Here’s the 2005 Carolina Panthers offensive playbook. Plenty of pages on situational football, positional fundamentals, and much more. If you are a football junkie, and you remember those days here, it’s a pretty compelling piece of literature.  

A few months ago, I spoke with Keary Colbert and Deshaun Foster. They couldn’t emphasize this enough: Jim Skipper was the brain child behind most of the clock management/situational football elements within this book. 

https://second-effort.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/2005-Carolina-Panthers-Offense.pdf

You are awesome Ellis

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11 minutes ago, ellis said:

Yeah, it takes a little bit of commitment to actually sit down and work through it. I love it, been doing it for years, and it’s highly instructive…gives me greater appreciation for the process when I watch practices and games.

For sure...

I've bought probably a dozen books on football strategy and coaching over the years. Heck, Lady Cowboy Fan got me a couple of scouting books as gifts, one by Neal Stratton and the other by Steve Belichick.

I probably need therapy 😕

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13 minutes ago, ellis said:

By the way, some of you may have come across this in the past, but if you haven’t… Here’s the 2005 Carolina Panthers offensive playbook. Plenty of pages on situational football, positional fundamentals, and much more. If you are a football junkie, and you remember those days here, it’s a pretty compelling piece of literature.  

A few months ago, I spoke with Keary Colbert and Deshaun Foster. They couldn’t emphasize this enough: Jim Skipper was the brain child behind most of the clock management/situational football elements within this book. 

https://second-effort.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/2005-Carolina-Panthers-Offense.pdf

Definitely gonna download this.

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1 hour ago, KSpan said:

Players sure liked Hurney, too.

It’s a bit different when you go into negotiations with a 3 year $15M offer proposed by your agent and 5 seconds into the tough negotiation act like a crazy man looking for a pen to sign Marty’s 5 year $45M take it or leave it deal.

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Players liked Seifert too.

Heck, teammates loved Delhomme and continued to support him even when it was obvious he was done.

You really can't go by who players like, even when it comes to coaches. Those are as likely to be emotional decisions as logical ones.

That's one of the reasons why I hate the idea of giving players (including franchise quarterbacks) a say in who the team hires or drafts.

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