FootballMaestro

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About FootballMaestro

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  1. #1 Defense vs. # Offense Narrative

    Well we gotta remember, the only reason why the Panthers slightly rush more than they pass, is because when the Panthers have 2TD+ leads (no matter when) they usually start rushing the ball 2-3 downs on each possession. If the Panther would play the way they did before they got their big lead, the passing #'s would be about 53-55%. The last Cardinal game was a perfect example of this. The Panthers got tired of hearing about "2nd half collapses", so they kept the pressure on, and Cam ended up with 335 passing yards. If the Panthers did their usual, Cam would have ended up with about 170+ yards or so, as he did vs Seattle the preceding game. Nonetheless, your points not lost that the Panthers have Stew, Tolbert, [even] Cam, and an OL that can maul defenders.
  2. Since he's been so professional discussing the Panthers lately, I'll let bygones be bygones.
  3. The best Cam Newton article this side of Nolan Nawrocki

    Come on. Don't you know, when things concern Cam and the Panthers, facts are unnecessary? LOL
  4. The best Cam Newton article this side of Nolan Nawrocki

    Love this passage here: What/SMH Didn't he win Rookie of the year in 2011, and had a stretch of 155 passes with an INT during his 2nd season (as well as passing the eye test). And if we take her literally, regarding 'not always playing at an especially high level his first couple of seasons'. Well;"duh" He was a first and 2nd year QB. So what the hell did you think! Love how they always move the Goal Post and and tighten the standards when it concerns Cam.  
  5. To Smith's Credit (at least the parts I saw on Mike & Mike this morning): He was very complimentary of the Panthers [overall] and Cam Newton. Judging by his comments, he made it as clear as possible (with out actually saying it) that the Panthers would win the game. So he's come along way in talking bout his former team, currently.
  6. Lewd dancing ... when can I expect national outrage?

    Well, this is true, and just like America. Puerto Rico's just a country not  a racial group (as most Latin America). They're black Puerto Rican's, white, mixed, and a few native (though you get that more so in Mexico, and South American countries). However, depending on the individuals and the country, some are open about their blackness, and others are not. Certain countries discourage because of invasion and colonialism-as you mentioned, and in others they're more open and self aware. But that's another story. LOL For the record. Arturo (also known as Arthur) Schomberg, who the Schomberg Center Of Black Research in Harlem was named after, is Puerto Rican (and of course black). But he knew the deal, and acknowledged that. Some do not.  However, let's keep this on football, unless we turn this into a world history and geology survey.
  7. Lewd dancing ... when can I expect national outrage?

    Don't forget Bill Russell and Kareem Abdul Jabbar (as well as others) who were from that era. But well said.
  8. ESPN's GIF of Cam Newton seems a bit off to me...

    He's also a relative String bean compared to the REAL CAM!
  9. Stephen A. Smith

    Yeah. I love how some people try to act like Cam's Allen Iverson, Marshawn Lynch;  Lil Wayne or somebody. LOL. He's not. Just because he has fun on the football field, doesn't make him Malcolm X or Stokely Carmichael. Cam has done everything right with his coaches and management since he's been in Charlotte. He's a respectful, hard working guy, always has been. So let's not try to act like he's some recalcitrant rebel/"Ghetto-Homeboy" that "The Man" can't stand because of it, just cause we like him and others "hate", are envious of him.
  10. Stephen A. Smith

    Fixed
  11. Stephen A. Smith

    All these things you said are not Black Issues. It's just Cam. The guys clean cut; god fearing, respectful; doesn't smoke, drink or party too much, while having fun on the field. Those are things that anyone can relate to, which is why he does so well in endorsements.
  12. Stephen A. Smith

    Funny, we're all talking about Stephen A: Both Cecil Newton, and George Whitfield are on First Take today. LOL
  13. Stephen A. Smith

    I think Stephen A. was being a shock jock there. He should know better. Obama ran vs Sara Palin (seen as a wack job by many/some) and John McCain (a reasonable guy who had to act like a wack job for the GOP nomination); mind you Obama's own likability or qualifications. Democrats and independents voted for him over them, as they trusted Obama more, regardless of his color (Who else were they supposed to vote for)? Many voters actually liked Obama, and the energy he brought to the campaign. It was historic. The guy had his own political machine, but still came off as fresh. He wasn't an outsider to say the least, as some wanna believe. He and his people know exactly what they were doing. This is when people can't get over their own color bias and experience (Stephen A.). He couldn't see Obama winning, but voters could/did. I'm not surprised. Note:"Wack job" is in the eye of the beholder. But certainly, by many traditional-Moderate GOP, independents and Democrats, Sarah Palin and Old Ass John McCain were a bit much. They were seen as "scary, and or incompetent" to many. In that respect; they were destined to lose, and nothing but cannon fodder for Obama. Not shocking why they lost/he won-really.
  14. Cam Newton disappointed me

    Bingo. He may be frustrated and disappointed, and ultimately never get over this. However, if he really thinks about it after the hurt subsides, you gotta realize your own culpability, and explain to your child what the situation was, since proper judgment wasn't exercised to begin with.
  15. Cam Newton disappointed me

    It's tough. I feel for the guy and his kids. Obviously, no one would like something like that to happen to them. At the same time, we have to realize our own individual culpability after the hurt or surprise fades away.