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White Vigilantes Massacred Blacks During Aftermath of Hurrican Katrina


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#1 Fiz

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 01:19 PM

Katrina's Hidden Race War

Donnell Herrington tells it, there was no warning. One second he was trudging through the heat. The next he was lying prostrate on the pavement, his life spilling out of a hole in his throat, his body racked with pain, his vision blurred and distorted.

It was September 1, 2005, some three days after Hurricane Katrina crashed into New Orleans, and somebody had just blasted Herrington, who is African-American, with a shotgun. "I just hit the ground. I didn't even know what happened," recalls Herrington, a burly 32-year-old with a soft drawl.

The sudden eruption of gunfire horrified Herrington's companions--his cousin Marcel Alexander, then 17, and friend Chris Collins, then 18, who are also black. "I looked at Donnell and he had this big old hole in his neck," Alexander recalls. "I tried to help him up, and they started shooting again." Herrington says he was staggering to his feet when a second shotgun blast struck him from behind; the spray of lead pellets also caught Collins and Alexander. The buckshot peppered Alexander's back, arm and buttocks.

Herrington shouted at the other men to run and turned to face his attackers: three armed white males. Herrington says he hadn't even seen the men or their weapons before the shooting began. As Alexander and Collins fled, Herrington ran in the opposite direction, his hand pressed to the bleeding wound on his throat. Behind him, he says, the gunmen yelled, "Get him! Get that ******!"

The attack occurred in Algiers Point. The Point, as locals call it, is a neighborhood within a neighborhood, a small cluster of ornate, immaculately maintained 150-year-old houses within the larger Algiers district. A nationally recognized historic area, Algiers Point is largely white, while the rest of Algiers is predominantly black. It's a "white enclave" whose residents have "a kind of siege mentality," says Tulane University historian Lance Hill, noting that some white New Orleanians "think of themselves as an oppressed minority."

A wide street lined with towering trees, Opelousas Avenue marks the dividing line between Algiers Point and greater Algiers, and the difference in wealth between the two areas is immediately noticeable. "On one side of Opelousas it's 'hood, on the other side it's suburbs," says one local. "The two sides are totally opposite, like muddy and clean."

Algiers Point has always been somewhat isolated: it's perched on the west bank of the Mississippi River, linked to the core of the city only by a ferry line and twin gray steel bridges. When the hurricane descended on Louisiana, Algiers Point got off relatively easy. While wide swaths of New Orleans were deluged, the levees ringing Algiers Point withstood the Mississippi's surging currents, preventing flooding; most homes and businesses in the area survived intact. As word spread that the area was dry, desperate people began heading toward the west bank, some walking over bridges, others traveling by boat. The National Guard soon designated the Algiers Point ferry landing an official evacuation site. Rescuers from the Coast Guard and other agencies brought flood victims to the ferry terminal, where soldiers loaded them onto buses headed for Texas.

Facing an influx of refugees, the residents of Algiers Point could have pulled together food, water and medical supplies for the flood victims. Instead, a group of white residents, convinced that crime would arrive with the human exodus, sought to seal off the area, blocking the roads in and out of the neighborhood by dragging lumber and downed trees into the streets. They stockpiled handguns, assault rifles, shotguns and at least one Uzi and began patrolling the streets in pickup trucks and SUVs. The newly formed militia, a loose band of about fifteen to thirty residents, most of them men, all of them white, was looking for thieves, outlaws or, as one member put it, anyone who simply "didn't belong."

The existence of this little army isn't a secret--in 2005 a few newspaper reporters wrote up the group's activities in glowing terms in articles that showed up on an array of pro-gun blogs; one Cox News story called it "the ultimate neighborhood watch." Herrington, for his part, recounted his ordeal in Spike Lee's documentary When the Levees Broke. But until now no one has ever seriously scrutinized what happened in Algiers Point during those days, and nobody has asked the obvious questions. Were the gunmen, as they claim, just trying to fend off looters? Or does Herrington's experience point to a different, far uglier truth?

Over the course of an eighteen-month investigation, I tracked down figures on all sides of the gunfire, speaking with the shooters of Algiers Point, gunshot survivors and those who witnessed the bloodshed. I interviewed police officers, forensic pathologists, firefighters, historians, medical doctors and private citizens, and studied more than 800 autopsies and piles of state death records. What emerged was a disturbing picture of New Orleans in the days after the storm, when the city fractured along racial fault lines as its government collapsed.

Herrington, Collins and Alexander's experience fits into a broader pattern of violence in which, evidence indicates, at least eleven people were shot. In each case the targets were African-American men, while the shooters, it appears, were all white.

The new information should reframe our understanding of the catastrophe. Immediately after the storm, the media portrayed African-Americans as looters and thugs--Mayor Ray Nagin, for example, told Oprah Winfrey that "hundreds of gang members" were marauding through the Superdome. Now it's clear that some of the most serious crimes committed during that time were the work of gun-toting white males.

So far, their crimes have gone unpunished. No one was ever arrested for shooting Herrington, Alexander and Collins--in fact, there was never an investigation. I found this story repeated over and over during my days in New Orleans. As a reporter who has spent more than a decade covering crime, I was startled to meet so many people with so much detailed information about potentially serious offenses, none of whom had ever been interviewed by police detectives.

Hill, who runs Tulane's Southern Institute for Education and Research and closely follows the city's racial dynamics, isn't surprised the Algiers Point gunmen have eluded arrest. Because of the widespread notion that blacks engaged in looting and thuggery as the disaster unfolded, Hill believes, many white New Orleanians approved of the vigilante activity that occurred in places like Algiers Point. "By and large, I think the white mentality is that these people are exempt--that even if they committed these crimes, they're really exempt from any kind of legal repercussion," Hill tells me. "It's sad to say, but I think that if any of these cases went to trial, and none of them have, I can't see a white person being convicted of any kind of crime against an African-American during that period."



#2 neverlosethefeeling

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 01:27 PM

President Bush hates black people.

#3 mmmbeans

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 01:53 PM

President Bush hates black people.


way to go strawman.

#4 Matt Foley

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 02:15 PM

Was there any black on white violence after Katrina?

#5 mmmbeans

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 02:25 PM

Was there any black on white violence after Katrina?


gosh I hope so.

#6 Matt Foley

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 02:46 PM

gosh I hope so.


Were THEY arrested?

#7 mmmbeans

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 02:53 PM

gosh I hope not.

#8 Murph

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 02:54 PM

Then it all evens out

#9 mmmbeans

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 02:58 PM

it's so comfortable when things are so simple.

#10 Murph

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 03:08 PM

Yep, I think I'll go home in a few minutes, crack open a beer and smile that all is well in the world.

#11 Saint J

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 03:10 PM

I'm sure things like this happened, but all the thugs who went to rich neighborhoods in the city like Uptown or the Garden District and were intimidating white people and stealing there deserved to be shot.

#12 Matt Foley

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 03:25 PM

According to this article, the only thugs were white racists with shotguns.

#13 Carolina Husker

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 03:44 PM

I shoot Colorado Buffalos on sight in my neighborhood. Same difference.

#14 Inimicus

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 04:01 PM

Yellow journalism at its finest.

No mention of the black gangs that moved into places like the Marigny & Bywater that the shot at Nat. Guard troops in the weeks and months after the disaster. Or how the Gretna police had the Creasent City Connector blocked off and were not letting people, white or black, accross to the West Bank that had gone practically untouched.

It was a disaster in every respect and to make it out like it was open season on black people is beyond irresponsible and damned near criminal.

#15 Murph

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 04:08 PM

Shhhh Iminicus Posted Image

Obama is now the president elect. You don't want the PC police visiting your house in a month or so.


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