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Bill Nye 'The Science Guy' Hits Evolution Deniers


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#16 The Saltman

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 01:08 PM

lol

#17 Niner National

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 01:09 PM

Posted Image

lol. I wonder if they have a Jesusaurus in there.

#18 Bronn

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 01:11 PM

I like how my first pic shows the complexity of human reason vs. god's word... You'd think most religious people would understand that they're taking the easy way out.

#19 The Saltman

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 01:16 PM

you can question man you absofuginglutely cant question god.

#20 Epistaxis

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 01:16 PM

The herbivore T-Rex until apple-biting is just precious.

#21 MadHatter

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 01:31 PM

I agree and so do 32% of those polled.

Unfortunately, there are a lot of people out there that believe dinosaurs and people either co-existed or that fossils were placed by the devil to test people's faith in God.

I do not believe in the bible or any organized religion for that matter, but I see no reason why religion and evolution cannot co-exist.


I am not going to get into debates or arguements over whether god exists or not (personal beliefs and quite frankly I don't have a clue whether he does or not). However, for someone to completely discredit evolution (and all of the tangible evidence that not only supports it but PROVES it) they must be a complete idiot.

You CANNOT look at all of the fossils and archeological evidence and just say....."I don't believe it".

If you want to be an intelligent religious person, I believe that you MUST be able to reconcile the two.

#22 NanuqoftheNorth

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 02:59 PM

It is difficult for many people to accept that we just don't have all the answers to the eternal questions that have confounded mankind throughout the ages.

That is why idols/gods/superstition have been so pervasive in our societies. They give our leaders and their minions a way to bridge the gap between the knowable and unknowable.

As a leader, it is much easier to create/perpetuate unfounded mythology to pacify the general publics need for answers than to admit you don't know and risk losing your lofty position of power to some other charlatan.

Accepting the fact that we will likely never know the true reason for our existence is a reality most people are not willing to face. It is much easier to go with the flow and adopt the prevailing myths of the day.

It has been this way throughout history.

#23 mmmbeans

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 03:04 PM

i think that underplays myth's role and importance in society... it can and does teach us many things... honestly, I believe that the US would do much better with a bit more myth and ceremony to bind us together. That said, myth is only functional when people share it, you can't force it on others and those who continue to try to push us toward "old religion" are doing a great deal of damage to our society as a whole.

sorry... been on a joseph campbell kick lately... myth on the brain.

#24 NanuqoftheNorth

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 03:16 PM

i think that underplays myth's role and importance in society... it can and does teach us many things... honestly, I believe that the US would do much better with a bit more myth and ceremony to bind us together. That said, myth is only functional when people share it, you can't force it on others and those who continue to try to push us toward "old religion" are doing a great deal of damage to our society as a whole.

sorry... been on a joseph campbell kick lately... myth on the brain.


Myths are helpful teaching tools when the receiver is educated enough to recognize a myth for what it is.

When the receiver lacks the ability to discern the difference between myth and reality you get a society that thinks Eve came from Adam's rib and humans lived with dinosaurs.

#25 mav1234

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 06:23 PM

I am not going to get into debates or arguements over whether god exists or not (personal beliefs and quite frankly I don't have a clue whether he does or not). However, for someone to completely discredit evolution (and all of the tangible evidence that not only supports it but PROVES it) they must be a complete idiot.

You CANNOT look at all of the fossils and archeological evidence and just say....."I don't believe it".

If you want to be an intelligent religious person, I believe that you MUST be able to reconcile the two.


I agree with this - I think there are a great many Christians who do find ways to keep with evolution and still believe that God played some role (e.g. biologos people), but overall, when most people discuss Creationism, they are talking about something much more specific than, "God started it all," or "God created evolution" or something, they are talking about a physical design process by a deity that literally made humans exactly as He intended etc.

IMO you can believe in God and still think evolution is true exactly as scientists say, but creationism in almost all of its uses is just not compatible with evolution. There are "versions" of creationism that may have some levels of compatibility but most are still involving determinism etc.

#26 pstall

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 06:44 PM



#27 Zod

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 05:46 AM

IMO you can believe in God and still think evolution is true exactly as scientists say, but creationism in almost all of its uses is just not compatible with evolution.



Not sure I agree.

There is a deistic approach that says god started things out in the universe then stepped back and is playing an observation role only. This would go hand in hand with evolution.

#28 mav1234

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 06:35 AM

That's not creationism in the typical usages (New Earth, Old Earth, even ID). Most individuals who actually have thought about that idea and come to that conclusion also realize that calling that "creationism" doesn't mesh with most of the typical creationist ideas at all.

#29 NanuqoftheNorth

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 05:26 PM

"Evolution is the fundamental idea in all of life science, in all of biology. It's like, it's very much analogous to trying to do geology without believing in tectonic plates. You're just not going to get the right answer. Your whole world is just going to be a mystery instead of an exciting place,".

http://gma.yahoo.com...-news-tech.html




#30 Sapper

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 08:52 PM

Arguing with people ingrained in their beliefs is not a fight worth fighting. We really need to look to the future. Bill Nye was an idol of mine growing up and my parents let me watch his show every second I got the chance. Meanwhile, I was going to church - at the behest of my parents.

They gave me both ends of the spectrum, and wanted me to decide on my own. And I did, and I am happy I got to experience both ends.

Also, does anyone else think Bill Nye looks like Andy Murray from the future?


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