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General OL Question


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#1 ViaVeritasVita

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 01:26 PM

with all the talk about the Panther's offensive line concerns, i am wondering what exactly the job of the offensive line is to do. i understand that they block for the QB and RBs. But is their main concern simply protection? or are they supposed to be driving the DL down the field? in other words... is the OL the "defense" of the offense? or are they just as active in advancing the ball as the rest of the offense?

 

forgive me if this is a football 101 question. ive never played the game on any sort of organized team so my ignorance in things like this is pretty high



#2 Mr. Scot

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 04:14 PM

In a nutshell...

 

On pass plays, keep people from getting to the passer.

 

On run plays, push people out of the way of the rusher.



#3 KillerKat

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 06:45 PM

In a nutshell...
 
On pass plays, keep people from getting to the passer.
 
On run plays, push people out of the way of the rusher.


In other words, the complete opposite of what Bell does.

#4 ViaVeritasVita

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 10:37 AM

In a nutshell...

 

On pass plays, keep people from getting to the passer.

 

On run plays, push people out of the way of the rusher.

 

in other words, its only necessary to push the opposing DL downfield during running plays? on passing plays, the OL acts as a "defense" of sorts for the QB...



#5 Mr. Scot

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 11:45 AM

in other words, its only necessary to push the opposing DL downfield during running plays? on passing plays, the OL acts as a "defense" of sorts for the QB...

 

Not just "necessary" actually.

 

By rule, offensive linemen are not allowed to go past the line of scrimmage on a pass play until the pass is thrown.  When you hear a ref call a  penalty for "ineligible receiver downfield" it's because one of the linemen crossed the line of scrimmage too soon.



#6 ViaVeritasVita

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 02:10 PM

Not just "necessary" actually.

 

By rule, offensive linemen are not allowed to go past the line of scrimmage on a pass play until the pass is thrown.  When you hear a ref call a  penalty for "ineligible receiver downfield" it's because one of the linemen crossed the line of scrimmage too soon.

 

thank you! i finally understand that penalty now. ive never understood how a lineman could be considered a receiver but now i get it. so how many "eligible receivers" is a team allowed to have per play?



#7 Mr. Scot

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 03:05 PM

thank you! i finally understand that penalty now. ive never understood how a lineman could be considered a receiver but now i get it. so how many "eligible receivers" is a team allowed to have per play?

 

You have to have at least five offensive linemen and a quarterback.  Anyone else can be eligible.  There are certain 'tackle eligible' formations but they're pretty rare.

 

Back when I first started high school, guys sometimes had to notify a ref that they were eligible (they changed the rules the following season and that didn't apply anymore).  I believe there are times in the NFL when something like that takes place.

 

If you wanna read up on it, here are two great print sources.  I own and have read both and would recommend them to anyone:

 

Football for Dummies by Howie Long

 

Play Football the NFL Way by Tom Bass

 

If you only want to master the basics, Howie Long's book is probably all you need, but I highly recommend the book by Tom Bass as well.  If you ever want to get really deep, check out the AFCA books on offensive and defensive strategies.

 

(yes, I've read them, but I'm a football addict) :unsure:

 

There are good online sources for 'Football 101' type knowledge too, but books are still my favorite method (yes, I'm old) :lol:



#8 ViaVeritasVita

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 05:37 PM

 

 

thanks Scot! this has really helped! :)



#9 ViaVeritasVita

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 05:38 PM

 

 

haha think maybe now i could go apply for a job as an analyst for ESPN?! ;)



#10 Mr. Scot

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 11:25 AM

Worth a shot :lol:

 

And no problem.  I'm always happy to answer Football 101 type questions when I see 'em.

 

Forty plus years of playing, coaching and watching football should be useful for something, right?



#11 The Huddler

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 12:52 PM

Not just "necessary" actually.

By rule, offensive linemen are not allowed to go past the line of scrimmage on a pass play until the pass is thrown. When you hear a ref call a penalty for "ineligible receiver downfield" it's because one of the linemen crossed the line of scrimmage too soon.


I thought it was 5 yards

#12 The Huddler

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 01:00 PM

in other words, its only necessary to push the opposing DL downfield during running plays? on passing plays, the OL acts as a "defense" of sorts for the QB...


On running plays the DL is usually the first group the OL has to block. But let's say a linebacker is in between two DL trying to blitz, that would be a reason an OL would block a LB, to drive him out of the way. Also, some running plays are designed so that some lineman slightly "chip" a DLineman, like a quick push, to help the OL next to him get good position on the DL. Once this is accomplished, the original OL can go to the " next level" which is usually the linebackers and on really successful plays the secondary.

Pretty confusing without a visual, but the OL are important because they block anyone trying to come in at the ball handler, whether a RB or QB. They make a lane and provide a path to the end zone for RBs and a pocket for QBs. RBs and QB can be as talented as ever, but if they don't even get a chance to make a play because the whole defense is on there ass, well its doesn't matter how good they are. As gettleman says, "big men allow you to compete", and I completely agree. Same goes for the defensive side of the ball, but that's a whole different lesson lol

#13 ViaVeritasVita

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 11:02 PM

On running plays the DL is usually the first group the OL has to block. But let's say a linebacker is in between two DL trying to blitz, that would be a reason an OL would block a LB, to drive him out of the way. Also, some running plays are designed so that some lineman slightly "chip" a DLineman, like a quick push, to help the OL next to him get good position on the DL. Once this is accomplished, the original OL can go to the " next level" which is usually the linebackers and on really successful plays the secondary.

Pretty confusing without a visual, but the OL are important because they block anyone trying to come in at the ball handler, whether a RB or QB. They make a lane and provide a path to the end zone for RBs and a pocket for QBs. RBs and QB can be as talented as ever, but if they don't even get a chance to make a play because the whole defense is on there ass, well its doesn't matter how good they are. As gettleman says, "big men allow you to compete", and I completely agree. Same goes for the defensive side of the ball, but that's a whole different lesson lol

 

thanks! :) i actually understand that even without a visual



#14 BuffaloBills62

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 07:30 PM

It depends on some things that are situational, too.  The type of offense run and the scheme, as well.  Some OL's are small, athletic and able to slide around easily.  Others are big, maulers that road grade.

 

The LT is a player that must have quick feet, long arms and able to hold off the LB who is almost always faster or the DE who is always almost as strong.  Being that the LT sits back on his laurels to protect the pass he has to be big and able to absorb the hits and contact.

 

The LG is usually a fast on his feet and the most athletic of the crew.  He's usually the one that will pull in many schemes.  He has to slide side to side to assist in blocking regardless of the front.

 

the OC is some times the strongest and toughest.  He takes on the bit NT's and DT's.  He rarely pulls, he rarely does anything but give the ball to the QB.

 

RG and RT go hand in hand.  The right side is where teams run the most.  It's not exactly accurate, but IIRC stats show it was 51-54% at the very least that runs go to the right.  That article was about 4 years ago.

 

RG is also able to pull, bigger then the LG and he also has the ability to take on LB's.  Like the LG, they need good feet and balance to attack 2nd level defenders, and the wheels to get them to the defenders to lead block.

 

RT's are huge players.  These are not usually big fatties.  They are lions, they are D-5 bulldozers.  The drive what is ahead of them but do not have the finesse of the LT.  They're just big, dumb, and go forward.

 

If you'd like more specific info, I can go further.  But, figure this might be good for ya.

 

Crap, I got a few more minutes.

 

Well, next time you watch football watch the OL.  They'll point out assignments and they'll call out schemes.  OL's have schemes just like in basketball.  If the DT is playing between the LT and the LG and more closely toward the LG while the the DE is way outside of the LT, well, they may call a scheme which puts the OC covering the DT and the LT and LG covering the DE.  Crap, any number of things could happen.  A cross block, where the LT blocks the DT and the LG blocks the DE.  The FB might go after the LB.  Because, some times you get a LB coming forward to blitz - that's when the OL start pointing and calling out assignments.  That's where Peyton Manning begins the whole "Omaha, Unicorns, Omaha, brunswick stew two dollars, I like turtles, Omaha."

 

Whats funny, you don't get it and most do not.  Sure, he's yelling Omaha but it's not Omaha that matters, it's how many times he is yelling Omaha or if he says Unicorns he is calling off the Omaha.  That may be telling his OL to block the LB because he is keeping the FB in the pocket to block and not come to the OL to assist, perhaps.  Maybe it's saying the FB is going to block at the line where ever is needed, or maybe just go after a blitzing LB.

 

And, of course, if that blitzing LB is faking the blitz you have an exposed unoccupied LB and a mismatch - advantage defense because you just put a defender somewhere Manning did not anticipate - likely in coverage and perhaps on the route he just audibled to and that could be a problem.

 

Anything else ya wanna know with specifics, ask away.



#15 The Huddler

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Posted 15 August 2014 - 08:00 PM

Go home bills fan. Where do you find the time in the day ....


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