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Cam Newton breakdown

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Posted

Legendary 9th post.

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Posted

this is already being talked about in another cam newton thread, but it's an interesting read. I more found the video clips near the end interesting.

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Posted

Cam Newton breakdance.

break_dance.jpg

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Posted

Not a bad post.... sometimes things like this get lost in a thread, escp one that get super long. I did not read the whole thing because it was to long and much. I did skim through, watch some of the videos, and read the conclusion.

I dont know what the Panthers should do, but hope they are seriously looking into and considering Cam.

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Posted

The run first section is the must read if the article.

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Posted



Source, link or it gets deleted.

Plagerism = bad.

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Posted

The most interesting comment: 6 Teams (including Miami, I assume) rate Cam Newton the top player in the draft. TRADE!!!!

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Posted



Source, link or it gets deleted.

Plagerism = bad.

the quote was from the linked article.

here: http://weblogs.sun-sentinel.com/sports/columnists/hyde/blog/2011/02/draft_winds_a_thorough_breakdo.html

and since teeray deleted the quote...here it is. the whole article, though long, is really well worth the read, esp for those on the borderline or who haven't totally closed their minds to him.

Style (the myth of the ‘run-first’ quarterback)

Cam Newton has another stigma associated with him that he can’t seem to shake. Some people like to consider him a ‘run-first’ quarterback. They might use the term ‘running’ quarterback, or any number of designations meant to convey the point that Newton is one of a long line of option quarterbacks at the college level that were glorified running backs and lack the passing skills to compete at the next level.

Miami Dol-Fans have some not-so-pleasant experience with that kind of quarterback in Pat White, drafted in the 2nd round on the promise that he could serve as the lead man in the Dolphins’ Wildcat 2.0 attack, while simultaneously training on his passing skills to where he could compete for the right to be considered a true franchise starter. Those that are quick to label a player this way are often firm in belief that the odds are stacked against this kind of player because his instincts tell them to bail on the play too quickly. While they are adamant that this kind of player cannot succeed, they are often short on definitions or methodology for determining if a quarterback is run-first.

Rather than settle for their Potter Stewart-esque explanations (“I know it when I see it”), we at Universal Draft have chosen to rely on facts and figures, isolating details rather than buying vagaries. The natural and undeniable conclusion is that nobody should accuse Cameron Newton of being a ‘run-first’ quarterback, or a glorified running back, or anything of the kind. The fact of the matter is we have isolated every single snap (both pass and run) of Cam Newton’s over his final six games against Ole Miss, Chattanooga, Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina and Oregon. What we found is that Newton only scrambled for yardage on a total of 15 of 169 pass snaps. The other 80 or so runs were called as run plays from the sidelines. The rate (just under 9%) at which Newton pulled down the ball and ran for yardage rather than continuing to try and pass the ball, was comparable with the rate at which Aaron Rodgers did the same (just under 8%) for the Green Bay Packers during the 2010 regular season, according to Pro Football Focus.

Of course, there’s more than that. Cynics may reply that a ‘run-first’ guy may still ultimately pass the ball but he is far too quick to give up on the pocket and begin scrambling around to try and make something happened. This would naturally mean that a large percentage of Newton’s throws came while scrambling around and making something happen. However, according to our research, only about 1 in 5 of Newton’s pass attempts during those final six games came under these conditions. Again according to Pro Football Focus, Aaron Rodgers threw a little over 1 in 5 of his pass attempts while ‘Under Pressure’.

The reality is that when Cam Newton was being recruited out of Westlake High School, he had to dispel scouts of the complete opposite notion, that he was just a pure pocket passer that didn’t use his feet to hurt teams. Here is a quote dated March 22nd, 2006 in a report about Newton’s recruiting prospects:

Some have labeled Newton as a pure pocket passer but he is quick to discard that assessment. “I used to just sit back in the pocket but now with defensive ends running 4.6 forty’s you have to be able to move around and make plays with your feet," he said. “Now, I consider myself a guy who can run and pass. I really like to sit back and throw the ball but if you give me some space I’ll tuck it and run.”

Consider another quote from a Recruiting Editor for TigerSportsDigest.com, dated May 2, 2006:

Newton, a 6-5, 220-pounder out of Atlanta (Ga.) Westlake, surprised nearly everyone in attendance when he posted a 4.51 in the 40-yard dash.

Everyone was well aware that he had a big league arm that could make all of the throws, but bringing his speed down from a 4.8 to a 4.5 makes him all the more dangerous when things break down in the pocket.

The fact that Newton had to go out of his way to dispel recruiters of the notion that he was just a pure pocket passer is not terribly shocking, if you’ve tracked what Newton did at Westlake High, where they ran the option “maybe twice a game” according to Cam back in 2006.

Additionally, if one were to study what Newton did at Blinn College, they would find a player that was not asked to run the ball as often as at Auburn. As Cecil Newton put it in discussing why they chose Blinn College, “He's going to get to take some snaps from under center out there at Blinn and the coaching staff there is well versed in a pro style scheme.”

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Posted

The most interesting comment: 6 Teams (including Miami, I assume) rate Cam Newton the top player in the draft. TRADE!!!!
that would be at least 6 teams. if we are one of those teams, and i hope we are, we would be fools to pass up on him and trade down.

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Posted

the quote was from the linked article.

here: http://weblogs.sun-sentinel.com/sports/columnists/hyde/blog/2011/02/draft_winds_a_thorough_breakdo.html

and since teeray deleted the quote...here it is. the whole article, though long, is really well worth the read, esp for those on the borderline or who haven't totally closed their minds to him.

I found this an interesting part about being a pocket passer in h.s and having to convince the opposite that he could run.

The reality is that when Cam Newton was being recruited out of Westlake High School, he had to dispel scouts of the complete opposite notion, that he was just a pure pocket passer that didn’t use his feet to hurt teams. Here is a quote dated March 22nd, 2006 in a report about Newton’s recruiting prospects:

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