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pstall

Why are Fish Camps, umm, called Fish Camps?

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Captain Morgan    11,469

the term "fish camp" exists in other states as well.

 

Imo, in the olden days, you could take the fish your caught to a fish camp, (perhaps originally in large tents?)

and they would fry your fish for you for a small fee.

 

I believe these evolved into restaurants (retaining the name fish camp) that served their own food, most often

family style.  I don't think you would find them in the mountains as much because there aren't as many lakes

and big rivers in the mountains.  Obvously, they were abundant near the coast.  

 

When I was growing up in Charlotte, my father had a favorite one just outside of town...221 Fish Camp?  long time ago.

 

They seem occur in clusters...Gaston county has several still to this day..

 

http://www.visitgaston.org/great-stories-of-gaston-county/item/fish-camps-a-gaston-county-tradition.html

 

 

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Inimicus    2,542

Because Fish Bivouac just doesn't roll off of the tongue as nicely.

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frash.exe    10,817

Why don't you smell the air and find out

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Captain Morgan    11,469

here's an article about one....  http://www.historysouth.org/food/fishcamp.html

 

 

you can read the whole article at the link....I think this is a pretty good idea of how they evolved...

 

Ask folks along the Catawba River in Gaston County how to spend an old-time weekend, and pretty quickly the talk will turn to fish camps.

Luther Lineberger started the first of these down-home restaurants back in 1948. According to a small, delightful exhibit at the Belmont Historical Society, “He began cooking up a mess of fish on Friday and/or Saturday nights for his friends and fellow mill workers of Cramerton Mills.”

Pretty soon he slapped up an eating house out of rough-sawn lumber, recalls Historical Society volunteer Max Robinson. “Burned off the splinters with a blowtorch,” says another volunteer, Jack Cannon.

By the 1960s half a dozen “fish camps” had folks lined out the door on weekend evenings. Catfish, carp and crappies caught right out of the Catawba gave way to shrimp, flounder and other fish from distant waters, battered and deep fried. Lineberger's burned in 1998 but many of the rest remain, clustered near the textile town of Belmont off Interstate 85 across the Catawba from Charlotte.

 

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Zod    14,969

We had them in Florida.

 

I was always told back during 1800s people who set up spots to fish and since there was no refrigeration they would dry and salt the fish in large make shift tents. Eventually they were called fish camps and the name just carried over to any place that serves fish.

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Captain Morgan    11,469

We had them in Florida.

 

I was always told back during 1800s people who set up spots to fish and since there was no refrigeration they would dry and salt the fish in large make shift tents. Eventually they were called fish camps and the name just carried over to any place that serves fish.

 

 

 

that sounds likely.  in those times, a big food event involved what was handy and who was around.

 

kinda like Brunswick stew.....everyone just brought what they had and threw it in the big washpot.

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Davidson Deac II    4,210

I see. It must be a flatlander thing. Never heard of such in the mountains. 

 

Its all over the mountains, but its mostly the older people that use the term.  My parents grew up in Wilkes county and they call seafood restaurants "Fish Camps".  At least the old style everything is battered and deep fried seafood restaurants.

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Floppin    5,443

Its all over the mountains, but its mostly the older people that use the term.  My parents grew up in Wilkes county and they call seafood restaurants "Fish Camps".  At least the old style everything is battered and deep fried seafood restaurants.

 

Wilkes county isn't the mountains. 

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Jakob    3,917

Lived in the piedmont my whole life, never heard of a fish camp until now.

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Davidson Deac II    4,210

Wilkes county isn't the mountains. 

 

So I guess all those mountains in Wilkes are just giant paper machete models.  :)

 

The western part of Wilkes is just as much "Mountains" as Watauga. 

The county's elevation ranges from 900 feet (375 meters) in the east to over 4,000 feet (1,219 meters) in the west. The Blue Ridge Mountains run from the southwest to the northeast, and dominate the county's western and northern horizons. Thompkins Knob, the highest point in the county, rises to 4,079 feet (1243 meters

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Chaos    8,174

Anyone remember Gus Purcell's on Independence Blvd with that vinegar slaw, or Hideaway fish camp on Monroe Rd., then there was the Seafarer with the big moving whale sign on Albermarle Rd, and Fish Farm in Matthews.  I'm talking about back in the day when these locales were rural, for those who also grew up around here.  It used to seem to take an hour to drive there from home, and now the city has grown up around them. 

 

Nostalgic, and yes - deep fried everything, a ton of popcorn shrimp, the red and white checkered table cloths, ketchup in the plain red squeeze bottles, sometimes hard to distinguish from the cocktail sauce squeeze bottle, sweet tea that was always a bit too sweet but still good, and that big lemon wedge to squeeze all over the fried goodness on your plate.  Takes me way back.  Don't forget the toothpick and mints on your way out the door.

  • Pie 2

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