Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Why are Fish Camps, umm, called Fish Camps?

39 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

Seems that when you hear it these days if refers to a fried seafood restaurant.

 

Back in the day it was shacks/campsites/old cottages where men gathered to get drunk, tell lies, and fish.

 

I see. It must be a flatlander thing. Never heard of such in the mountains. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I see. It must be a flatlander thing. Never heard of such in the mountains. 

 

I think so.

 

My grandparents beach house started as such.

 

Small shack that would sleep about 8 and a kitchen area where they could cook the fish.  They littered Topsail Island back in the day.

 

Now people just call them houses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I'm pretty sure it's a Piedmont thing.  They've been called that for 60+ years around here.  Damn yokels.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

the term "fish camp" exists in other states as well.

 

Imo, in the olden days, you could take the fish your caught to a fish camp, (perhaps originally in large tents?)

and they would fry your fish for you for a small fee.

 

I believe these evolved into restaurants (retaining the name fish camp) that served their own food, most often

family style.  I don't think you would find them in the mountains as much because there aren't as many lakes

and big rivers in the mountains.  Obvously, they were abundant near the coast.  

 

When I was growing up in Charlotte, my father had a favorite one just outside of town...221 Fish Camp?  long time ago.

 

They seem occur in clusters...Gaston county has several still to this day..

 

http://www.visitgaston.org/great-stories-of-gaston-county/item/fish-camps-a-gaston-county-tradition.html

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Because Fish Bivouac just doesn't roll off of the tongue as nicely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Why don't you smell the air and find out

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

here's an article about one....  http://www.historysouth.org/food/fishcamp.html

 

 

you can read the whole article at the link....I think this is a pretty good idea of how they evolved...

 

Ask folks along the Catawba River in Gaston County how to spend an old-time weekend, and pretty quickly the talk will turn to fish camps.

Luther Lineberger started the first of these down-home restaurants back in 1948. According to a small, delightful exhibit at the Belmont Historical Society, “He began cooking up a mess of fish on Friday and/or Saturday nights for his friends and fellow mill workers of Cramerton Mills.”

Pretty soon he slapped up an eating house out of rough-sawn lumber, recalls Historical Society volunteer Max Robinson. “Burned off the splinters with a blowtorch,” says another volunteer, Jack Cannon.

By the 1960s half a dozen “fish camps” had folks lined out the door on weekend evenings. Catfish, carp and crappies caught right out of the Catawba gave way to shrimp, flounder and other fish from distant waters, battered and deep fried. Lineberger's burned in 1998 but many of the rest remain, clustered near the textile town of Belmont off Interstate 85 across the Catawba from Charlotte.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I grew up in Chapel Hill in the 70s and 80s, never heard of it.  Must be a State thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

We had them in Florida.

 

I was always told back during 1800s people who set up spots to fish and since there was no refrigeration they would dry and salt the fish in large make shift tents. Eventually they were called fish camps and the name just carried over to any place that serves fish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

We had them in Florida.

 

I was always told back during 1800s people who set up spots to fish and since there was no refrigeration they would dry and salt the fish in large make shift tents. Eventually they were called fish camps and the name just carried over to any place that serves fish.

 

 

 

that sounds likely.  in those times, a big food event involved what was handy and who was around.

 

kinda like Brunswick stew.....everyone just brought what they had and threw it in the big washpot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Nothing beats Long Creek Fish Fry.  Nothing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites