Jump to content
  • Hey There!

    Please register to see fewer ads and a better viewing experience:100_Emoji_42x42:

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

g5jamz

Where does your tax money go (NC version)?

Recommended Posts



29 minutes ago, Paa Langfart said:

I thought the lottery was supposed to be covering public education ?

Cooperate tax cuts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Paa Langfart said:

I thought the lottery was supposed to be covering public education ?

it's supposed to go to school construction, but yes.  Lottery isn't a tax though.  I'm very anti-lottery as I believe it hurts more people than it helps.  It's a tax on the poor and hopeless.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, g5jamz said:

it's supposed to go to school construction, but yes.  Lottery isn't a tax though.  I'm very anti-lottery as I believe it hurts more people than it helps.  It's a tax on the poor and hopeless.  

On this we can agree. It's government enabling, encouraging, and profiting off addictive behavior.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Paa Langfart said:

I thought the lottery was supposed to be covering public education ?

I don't know how it worked in NC, (haven't lived there since 2000) but most states I've lived in for a significant amount of time tend to start the lottery saying they will use the proceeds for education, then after several years it starts to go to the "general" fund.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, g5jamz said:

it's supposed to go to school construction, but yes.  Lottery isn't a tax though.  I'm very anti-lottery as I believe it hurts more people than it helps.  It's a tax on the poor and hopeless.  

One can get treatment for gambling- not so for taxes.

The public gets a vote on whether lotteries can operate in their state- not so for taxes.

There are a lot of entities out there making huge profits off the poor and hopeless, the lottery not being the worst.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a teacher, I can tell you it's not enough going to the classrooms.

Sure, my salary stinks.  It's laughable compared to the national average, or even for someone with a much easier, less demanding job.  But I never went into education for a six figure salary (I'll pass on being a principal).

While something needs to happen to push our state salary up, we need a lot of help in classrooms as well.  Sometimes, you can get help with donor's choose or grants and stuff, but the lack of materials, deferred maintenance, and in school support are even worse.  That's what many of the other demonstrating teachers are mad about.  Sure, they'd like to get paid more (the jump from $32-36k was pretty life changing when I got my career status), but we'd like the rest of the school to function just as well.

Let's talk about textbooks....  Eww, gross.  And there are very few replacements.  I had a class thrown at me 2 weeks before school started one year (yay cuts!) that I'd never taught.  We finally got textbooks in December, and only 17, not even enough for a class set (33).  Yeah, that was interesting.  My wife taught in a trailer (mobile unit or "learning cottage") where students began to fall through the floor, because it was falling apart. You see the stories of black mold, pest infestation, etc on the news.  They are true.

I'd love to tell the NC GA "You get what you pay for." But there are too many who want to completely deconstruct the educational system in NC for some weird hybrid charter system where schools are run like businesses, and no one is happy.  I saw that happen to a friend's school.  Their long time principal was transferred, the new admin were all "consultants" who charged the county a poo ton of money and bailed after two years, and the test scores were even worse.

It's going to take time and money to "fix" education, until a new NCGA is elected, don't expect to see many improvements.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, g5jamz said:

 

 

20 hours ago, Paa Langfart said:

I thought the lottery was supposed to be covering public education ?

Lottery still is considered revenue and goes to budgeting.

 

The John locke foundation got a little creative with the graph - sure about 50% of the state money goes to education but it does not graph out they way the OP shows it.   The graph makes it seem like 70%.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just so everyone knows - Jammy here is putting up a graph that is modeled incorrectly and done by a foundation funded almost fully by a racist rich republican prick.

 

--

 

http://www.dailytarheel.com/article/2017/10/art-popes-racist-history-with-unc

--

The Court considered two separate issues in these four cases, all of which grew out of challenges to the far-right takeover of North Carolina’s legislature in 2010. Following the 2008 election, when North Carolina gave its fifteen electoral votes to Barack Obama, extremist PACs followed Republican businessman Art Pope’s lead and invested unprecedented sums of money in state legislature races.

Winning a majority, they quickly redrew both the state legislative districts and the U.S. Congressional districts in their favor; they deliberately used race as their primary criterion. “Stacking and packing” Black voters in as few districts as possible, extremists who had hijacked the Republican party consolidated their power through gerrymandering.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/nbcblk/oped-gop-colluded-racism-hack-north-carolina-election-n775346

 

--

Schalin is the director of policy analysis at the John William Pope Center for Higher Education, a right-wing think tank funded by discount-store magnate Art Pope, the conservative kingmaker who helped flip the state legislature to the Republicans in 2010 and bankrolled the 2012 election of Republican Governor Pat McCrory. The organization that hosted Schalin’s lecture, the John Locke Foundation, is also funded by Pope’s family foundation. As I walked into the building, I passed the local office of Americans for Prosperity, the Tea Party group founded by Charles and David Koch; Pope once chaired its national board. Two blocks away is the John W. Pope Civitas Institute and Civitas Action, another Pope-funded think tank and dark-money group, respectively.

Though Pope’s tentacles reach into many state institutions now, his empire of conservative idea-factories was originally established to counter what he and his associates perceived as liberal bias in the North Carolina’s university system, as Jane Mayer reported in a 2011 profile in The New Yorker. Pope’s interest in UNC goes back to his father, a trustee at UNC–Chapel Hill, who believed that the university, as Mayer reported, had been “taken over by radical scholars.” Pope himself made a bid for a seat on UNC’s Board of Governors in 1995. He was rebuffed. So he turned his attention upstream, to the North Carolina state legislature, which appoints the 32-member board. When Republicans took control of the General Assembly in 2010—for the first time since 1870—Pope’s network looked less like a counterweight to campus liberalism than a conservative wrecking ball aimed at the entire state.

...

You can’t separate what’s happening at the Board of Governors from what’s happening in the legislature,” Gene Nichol said over the phone in March. “They govern for the white, wealthy, straight Christians, mostly for the males, and all the rest be damned.”

If only the wealthiest and whitest come to UNC Chapel Hill, all the better. That doesn’t trouble them at all,” Nichol said when I met him in April at the off-campus office building that houses the poverty center, which he took over in 2008 after a stint as the president of the College of William & Mary. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Art Pope has almost single handedly decimated public education in NC.   

 

--

ALEIGH, N.C. — A new study has ranked North Carolina's public schools 40th in the nation on a national report card, citing insufficient funding as one of the reasons.

Education Week's annual "Quality Counts" survey features national and state-by-state grades, data and analysis.

North Carolina was ranked in the top 20 as recently as a decade ago. But after a recession and deep budget cuts, the rankings slid. Although the economy has come back, whatever education funding the state has restored is not keeping up with other states.

In Education Week's 2018 survey, North Carolina's schools received a C- overall grade. That's below the national average of C and one place lower than last year. The survey looked at dozens of factors, from employment rates and household education levels to student performance on standardized tests and how much funding schools get.

For chance of success after graduation, North Carolina ranked 31st, a C+. Student achievement was 33rd in the country, a D+. On school funding, North Carolina came in 45th, a D.

Legislative leaders are working on an overhaul of how the state funds its schools. Mark Jewell, president of the North Carolina Association of Educators, says they need to start with more money.1

"We're 43rd in the nation in per-pupil funding. That's $3,000 below the national average. We haven't had basic supplies such as textbooks, technology, pencils, paper," he said.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, d-dave said:

As a teacher, I can tell you it's not enough going to the classrooms.

Sure, my salary stinks.  It's laughable compared to the national average, or even for someone with a much easier, less demanding job.  But I never went into education for a six figure salary (I'll pass on being a principal).

While something needs to happen to push our state salary up, we need a lot of help in classrooms as well.  Sometimes, you can get help with donor's choose or grants and stuff, but the lack of materials, deferred maintenance, and in school support are even worse.  That's what many of the other demonstrating teachers are mad about.  Sure, they'd like to get paid more (the jump from $32-36k was pretty life changing when I got my career status), but we'd like the rest of the school to function just as well.

Let's talk about textbooks....  Eww, gross.  And there are very few replacements.  I had a class thrown at me 2 weeks before school started one year (yay cuts!) that I'd never taught.  We finally got textbooks in December, and only 17, not even enough for a class set (33).  Yeah, that was interesting.  My wife taught in a trailer (mobile unit or "learning cottage") where students began to fall through the floor, because it was falling apart. You see the stories of black mold, pest infestation, etc on the news.  They are true.

I'd love to tell the NC GA "You get what you pay for." But there are too many who want to completely deconstruct the educational system in NC for some weird hybrid charter system where schools are run like businesses, and no one is happy.  I saw that happen to a friend's school.  Their long time principal was transferred, the new admin were all "consultants" who charged the county a poo ton of money and bailed after two years, and the test scores were even worse.

It's going to take time and money to "fix" education, until a new NCGA is elected, don't expect to see many improvements.

Have you ever requested access to see the budget for the State and local? Be curious to see what you come up with. I think far too many school districts do a horrible job of properly allocating the funds they do get. And some sandbag to constantly get money for their own gain. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Noone is hording money in NC - education has seen cuts during the recession that have not been restored.

 

--

state-funding-per-student-fy-2008-2015_i

 

 

Budget Year 2008-09 2014-15
Teacher Pay 25th in U.S. 46th in U.S.
Teacher Career Status* Yes No (except for those who have already earned it)
Salary Supplement for Master’s Degree Yes No
NC Teaching Fellows Program Yes No
Class Size Capped (grades 4-12) Yes No
Per Pupil Expenditure** $5,896 $5,766 ($130 less)
Total Education Budget** $8.706 B $8.766 B ($60 million more)
Student Population*** 1,476,566 1,520,305

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, pstall said:

Have you ever requested access to see the budget for the State and local? Be curious to see what you come up with. I think far too many school districts do a horrible job of properly allocating the funds they do get. And some sandbag to constantly get money for their own gain. 

I've seen bits and pieces of budget areas...I can tell you that is a dizzying thing.  I imagine it's about as opaque as the most recent Omnibus Spending Bill.

I will say, there is an awful lot that goes into the logistic of running a school system.  Doing that kind of budgeting is well above my pay grade and expertise.  Talking to the distract workmen (many who are low education, conservatives - Trump's kind of people), they would tell me that they were always having to do more with less.  Only occasionally would they get funds to actually fix something well.

For example, at a school I was in, they used the auditorium as a "holding area" for students between 6:45-7:10 (bell for first period).  The lights were left on day after day.  These were those 120 watt incandescent lights that got really hot.  They also had a very short life due to being left on 24 hours a day.  I would turn them off daily when I left only for the over night cleaning crew to turn them on sometime later.  It was miserable, dark and hot.  The AC ran all the time, but it couldn't keep up between the masses of people and the lights being on so long.  

I was calling to have the lamps replaced weekly.  There were 50 or so individual fixtures to cover the seating area.  The guys were always really cool, but they were frustrated because they wanted to replace those incandescent lamps with LEDs because the cheaper incandescent lamps were hard to find.  Also, the LEDs would last forever.  They were told the building would be renovated in the next 2-3 years, and the district wouldn't buy the replacement lamps.

It wasn't until district brass came in for some event (NHS inductions I think), saw how dark and dangerous it was.  The next day the guys came back and put brand new LED lamps in all of those positions.  I had the brightest house lights I'd ever had, the AC could work more efficiently, and it was much more difficult for kids to get "lost" in a crowd of 400 kids doing inappropriate things.  We busted several drug deals the first week.  The SRO would just hang out and easily catch those kids.

All in all, it was a very small amount of money for CMS's billion dollar budget, and it mad a HUGE difference.  I think there is a lot of internal savings that could  be redirecting from the bureaucracy, but that will take years to do.  What do you do for kids now?  Like the kids in Oklahoma who ended up getting Blake Shelton's 37 year old textbook?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites



  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      19,529
    • Most Online
      2,867

    Newest Member
    The_Apostle610
    Joined
  • Topics

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      143,147
    • Total Posts
      4,595,731
×