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The downsides of being rich


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#16 Big A

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 02:29 PM

"Don't cry for me AlicejaAAAAAAAANDRAAAAAA"


Sent from my iPhizzle while pooping using CarolinaHizzle


Why did I know my name would be brought up when I opened this thread. Just because I enjoy nice things doesn't suddenly make me shallow, I also do nice things for people all the time. I will say there is a few correct points, it hard to figure out if someone is with you for the money initially, so it makes you a bit suspicious of new relationships. Also, it seems often it's perceived that a wealthier person doesn't deserve to get repaid for small things that were loans or is expected to pay more for shared expenses, I just had this with a new tenant who clogged up the AC unit with the dust from renovations they were doing, so now there is cost of $265 to clean the coil. To be nice, I offered to split the cost with him even though it is legally and contractually his responsibility for the entire cost. Instead if being grateful, he starts whining about the money he's spending on trying to start his business and says it would be such a minimal expense for me with how well I do, so I should just pay for ALL of it. Happens all the time!

#17 332nd

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 02:30 PM

I have always wanted to become wealthy, but it goes beyond my dreams. My parents poured all of their time into me and my two siblings. Worked for themselves so they could make every practice and game we played in. They don't have much, if any money, and I would love to be able to repay them by making their later years as comfortable as possible.

The three of us are successful and have great lives ahead of us because of them, I would just love to be able to give more back, as I took a lot.


That was part of my plan as well, unfortunately both parents died before I made good. So now I hope to double down on fostering & adoption. I was adopted & have sworn since I was 5 that I would give another kid the shot they gave me. I figure if I can be half as good its a win.

#18 SCP

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 02:54 PM

Why did I know my name would be brought up when I opened this thread. Just because I enjoy nice things doesn't suddenly make me shallow, I also do nice things for people all the time. I will say there is a few correct points, it hard to figure out if someone is with you for the money initially, so it makes you a bit suspicious of new relationships. Also, it seems often it's perceived that a wealthier person doesn't deserve to get repaid for small things that were loans or is expected to pay more for shared expenses, I just had this with a new tenant who clogged up the AC unit with the dust from renovations they were doing, so now there is cost of $265 to clean the coil. To be nice, I offered to split the cost with him even though it is legally and contractually his responsibility for the entire cost. Instead if being grateful, he starts whining about the money he's spending on trying to start his business and says it would be such a minimal expense for me with how well I do, so I should just pay for ALL of it. Happens all the time!

My opinion is derived from all the pictures you tend to post to prove your wealth to nameless online message board accounts. And you type story after story detailing the money you spend on things. That's your deal, whatevs, not bashing. I mean 85% of my posts are about poop/pooping. The devil is in the details of your posts. The one above just oozes douche, but don't take it personal, I don't even know you.



Sent from my iPhizzle while pooping using CarolinaHizzle

Edited by SCP, 23 July 2014 - 03:02 PM.


#19 Bronn

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 02:58 PM

Those poor, poor, rich people.

 

I think there is a huge difference in earning monetary wealth in an honest/high moral way (extremely hard to do today, I think) and coming into it via family or lottery or taking advantage of people/exploiting resources, etc.
 



#20 MadHatter

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 03:17 PM

Those poor, poor, rich people.

 

I think there is a huge difference in earning monetary wealth in an honest/high moral way (extremely hard to do today, I think) and coming into it via family or lottery or taking advantage of people/exploiting resources, etc.
 

With the right focus on education and work ethic, it is not nearly as hard as you think it is.



#21 Bronn

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 03:25 PM

With the right focus on education and work ethic, it is not nearly as hard as you think it is.

 

LOL

 

Your personal experience and opportunities don't equate to everyone else's.


Edited by Bronn, 23 July 2014 - 03:25 PM.


#22 MadHatter

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 03:41 PM

LOL

 

Your personal experience and opportunities don't equate to everyone else's.

Let's take a look at my "opportunities":

 

Neither of my parents were college graduates

My parents did not pay a penny of my college education

I worked 3 jobs (over 40 hrs a week to not have big school loans) and carried a full load

I chose a school where I could like at home to save on expenses

I chose a degree where it offered a good career opportunity

 

Please explain how I had all of these opportunities that you and others didn't.

 

You make the assertion that you just can't do it....I make the assertion that you can't do it without putting in the work and effort.

 

Plain and simple...I decided at a young age that an education was the answer to improving my life.  Not my fault that you didn't.


Edited by MadHatter, 23 July 2014 - 03:42 PM.


#23 Frash Brastard

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 03:44 PM

Opportunity: your parents not kicking you out of the house and forcing you to also pay rent somewhere on top of everything

#24 Zaximus

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 03:46 PM

The fact is that even if you get a good education and work hard, very few career choices are going to help you get "rich".  I'm sure obviously some will, but obviously EVERYONE can't choose those but yet we need people doing the other jobs too.  Then you have crap that comes up too, like medical expenses, deaths, etc. 



#25 MadHatter

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 03:48 PM

Opportunity: your parents not kicking you out of the house and forcing you to also pay rent somewhere on top of everything

 

Point taken....that is definitely an opportunity that my parents afforded me.

 

It is sad and pathetic that a parent would kick their kid out of the house if they were working and going to college.  Now, if they had graduated school and decided that they were not going to school, that is another story.  If they were working a part time job and laying around the house all day or getting in trouble with their friends.....then I could see telling them to get on with their life and move out.



#26 MadHatter

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 03:50 PM

The fact is that even if you get a good education and work hard, very few career choices are going to help you get "rich".  I'm sure obviously some will, but obviously EVERYONE can't choose those but yet we need people doing the other jobs too.  Then you have crap that comes up too, like medical expenses, deaths, etc. 

 

That is very true.  My point is that too many people (not all) just make the statement that life was not fair and they did not get opportunities....without doing whatever THEY CAN to make their opportunities.



#27 Frash Brastard

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 03:54 PM

Point taken....that is definitely an opportunity that my parents afforded me.

It is sad and pathetic that a parent would kick their kid out of the house if they were working and going to college. Now, if they had graduated school and decided that they were not going to school, that is another story. If they were working a part time job and laying around the house all day or getting in trouble with their friends.....then I could see telling them to get on with their life and move out.


Truthfully it is the philosophy of some parents that 18 means your kid needs to leave the nest, bottom line. I don't agree with it in a universal context but I've witnessed it.

#28 MadHatter

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 04:00 PM

Truthfully it is the philosophy of some parents that 18 means your kid needs to leave the nest, bottom line. I don't agree with it in a universal context but I've witnessed it.

 

I feel sorry for the kids who have parent's with that philosophy.  Having that attitude actually will set their kids up for a much harder life.  When the parent's value education that little, it usually rubs off on the kid.

 

My kids will know that they can live at home if they are getting an education.  However, they moment they would decide that an education was not for them and got a job, it would be time for them to break out on their own.  Both because they need to learn to be accountable for their own lives and decisions but also so that they can see quickly how difficult a life without an education and marketable skillset is.  Maybe, just maybe, that would help change their mind and get them back on that path of an educaiton and much easier life.



#29 Zaximus

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 04:01 PM

Truthfully it is the philosophy of some parents that 18 means your kid needs to leave the nest, bottom line. I don't agree with it in a universal context but I've witnessed it.

 

Yeah I feel like that is changing a bit, now with the job market the last few years and stuff, a lot of kids are staying at home even after college.  Granted a lot of that is choosing degrees that don't net you a job, period.  It's true there are a lot of terrible parents so people have a huge challenge from the get go.   Some people never even got to be a kid in the first place and then at 18 they get kicked out or whatever.

 

My parents let me sit around for about a year after high school some years ago, mainly because we were moving and my father was just getting over a very bad illness that almost took his life.  After that they told me I need to do something, go to some kind of trade/college school or get a job.  I ended up getting my degree and then getting a job a couple months later.  I had it pretty good and I admit it, I only even moved out when I got that job because I felt it was "time".  They didn't ask me to leave.  Hell they still try to pay for my wife and I's meals when we go out to eat, and they aren't rich or anything lol.

 

So I get that people have the cards stacked against them from the get go, my wife is one of those people.  When I have children I'd be happy to be AS GOOD as my parents have been.



#30 GOOGLE RON PAUL

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 04:10 PM

 

 

“Most people now want something out of you, and it can be harder to figure out whether someone is being nice to you because they like you, or they are being nice to you because of your money,”

 

yeah poor ppl don't have to worry about being exploi-hahahahaha.

 

also they have the added benefit of constantly having to worry about how they will afford life's basic necessities while the rich cry into handfuls of hundreds




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