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Drafting Quarterbacks


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#1 Cavscout

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 02:22 PM

The last time a team drafted a QB in either rd1 or rd2 and then selected another QB the next year in rd1 or rd2 was 1982-83. It happened twice that time.

The two teams that did it were the Baltimore Colts and the Buffalo Bills.

In 1982 Baltimore selected Art Schlichter with the 4th pick in rd1 out of Ohio State and the Buffalo Bills selected Matt Kofler out of San Diego State with the 48th selection in rd2.

The next year, Baltimore selected John Elway with the number one pick out of Stanford. Elway would then choose to play baseball if not traded so Baltimore traded him to Denver. Buffalo selected their one and only franchise QB Jim Kelly with the 14th selection of the 1983 draft out of Miami.

Imagine if Baltimore and Buffalo had decided to stick with those QB's instead of drafting another. It would have changed the fate of Buffalo, Baltimore, and Denver.

Incidently, 1982 was when Oliver Luck, Andrew's father, was drafted in rd 2 by the Houston Oilers. They decided to stick with their rookie QB for several years before they gave up on him. Imagine if Houston had given up on Oliver Luck, they could of had Dan Marino in rd 1 of 1983, the very next year.

The moral of this story...stick with your young QB, who has not shown signs of being a decent NFL QB, or look to improve the position anyway even if you could have a potential starter in Clausen.

Picking Luck or not if we get the #1 pick could very well change the destiny of the franchise.

Also keep in mind that the Houston Oilers, who turned down the chance of drafting a rd1 QB the next year and the Baltimore Colts who traded Elway's rights away ...Both teams relocated to new cities.

The teams that took franchise QB's in 1983, all remain in their same cities. I am not saying the Panthers will move if they don't get Luck, but it is still very interesting.

#2 Catalyst

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 06:29 AM

Heh, I didn't know Luck's dad played.

#3 Cavscout

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 07:57 AM

He was actually pretty good in college at WVa. He was the third QB drafted in 1982 behind Art Schlichter and Jim McMahon.

#4 mav1234

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 08:08 AM

A franchise QB can change everything about a team.

That's a neat bit of trivia there, thanks for finding it!

#5 zebrainz

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 12:25 PM

The last time a team drafted a QB in either rd1 or rd2 and then selected another QB the next year in rd1 or rd2 was 1982-83. It happened twice that time.


Missed a few, kinda

1984, CIN, Boomer Esiason-2nd, Wayne Peace-1st (supplemental, UFL disbanded)
1989, DAL, Troy Aikman-1st, Steve Walsh-1st (supplemental)
2007-2009, MIA, John Beck, Chad Henne, Pat White, all 2nds in consecutive years

source: PFR's draft finder

1983 was the equivalent of what 2012 will be if there is a strike/lockout. Many players won't declare early because of the uncertainty if no agreement is reached. There was an opportunity for teams to aquire multiple "once in an era" talents in a single draft. I don't mind Hurney trading away the 2011 2nd rounder so much, although in hindsight I wish he had done something else with the pick. On the other hand, 2012 pics are golden. The question is, how are the order of 2012 picks determined if there is no football in 2011? Lockout means no scab/replacement games if I'm interpreting it right.

#6 rayzor

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 12:42 PM

2012 picks will be via lottery if no football in 2011. also, there will be no football. no scabs.

i will say that there will be no incentive for players to wait until the following year to come out...but there are plenty of incentives to come out into the draft.

1) playing another year in college means more playing time without pay. thats more mileage, increased wear and tear on their bodies, and increased chance of injury.

2) there is a pretty big chance that their stock miight take a dive either through bad production or injury. if they have a high value right now, they'd be better off not risking it.

3) they'd still have teams and they would be getting paid at some point. lockout won't last forever.

4) while it might make the 2012 draft a better and more rich ones for teams because there is so much talent at once, it wouldn't do much for the value of the players in the draft. market would be crowded creating essentially a buyers market. that isn't a good thing for the seller (player).

only reason i can see for staying in college and playing is scholarship money. also, if they aren't slated to go very early in the draft then they might help their stock by playing another year, but if they are projected to be a first round pick anyway, esp. a top 15 pick this year, they are better off coming out. the closer they are to the #1 pick, the more reason they have for coming out.

#7 unicar15

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 12:48 PM

There is no way in hell we pass on Andrew Luck. The only way he isn't a Panther next year is if he stays in school or refuses to play for us. Can you imagine the fan mutiny if JR passed on Luck because he was too cheap to pay him? He already has to make up for the fact that he essentially threw in the towel this season. It would literally be a franchise-killing move to pass on someone that scouts are touting as "the best prospect since Peyton Manning."


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