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Boy with autism arrested for assault after police called to classroom


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#1 CatofWar

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 10:31 AM

QUINCY, ILL. -- A Quincy mother is upset over the way she said school officials treated her son who has autism during an incident Friday at Baldwin South Intermediate School.

Brandi Kirchner said that her 9-year-old son Roger Parker, Jr. had "a meltdown" during class. School officials sent him to a special area to calm down.

The boy climbed a dividing wall and the school called in a police officer to deal with him, the mother said. In the attempt to pull Roger off the wall, the officer pulled the boy by his arms and legs, causing him to hit his eye on the divider, Kirchner said.

The officer then tried to restrain the boy when Roger swung around and kicked the officer in his nose, Kirchner said.

Kirchner said the officer pulled her son to the floor. He was handcuffed and taken to the police station. She had to go to the station to get her son.

"I asked to see my son. Forty-five minutes later, after they told me he did not need a parent present because he was under arrest and not being interrogated,” she said. “He was fingerprinted, photographed and booked for aggravated battery to a police officer.”


http://www.connecttr...f37239ed7c18548

#2 SuperMan

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 10:50 AM

It is ridiculous that they would even consider arresting a child that young and with a disability, the boy clearly couldn't have know what he was doing at the time.

Some of the things our law enforcement officers have done in recent years are beyond inexcusable.

#3 Toolbox

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 11:42 AM

I agree..law enforcement has the gung ho shoot first ask questions later mentality.. and nothing good ever comes from it.

#4 rodeo

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 11:52 AM

Idiot cop.

A kid who acts like that shouldn't be in regular school anyways.

#5 SuperMan

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 12:06 PM

Idiot cop.

A kid who acts like that shouldn't be in regular school anyways.


Something we agree on for a change imagine that.

The boy was clearly troubled with the kind of size advantage a grown man has you would think he would be far more careful the bruises the kid suffered are completely inexcusable.

#6 Floppin

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 12:13 PM

Idiot cop.

A kid who acts like that shouldn't be in regular school anyways.


I'm willing to bet that he wasn't in "regular school". My elementary school had specific classes and, in fact, a separate wing of the school for special needs children. It's this way with most schools. I don't know of any school district that puts autistic, or otherwise disabled children, in with children who don't have disabilities.

#7 Floppin

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 12:16 PM

Ok, so I didn't read the entire article. Egg on my face.

Lee says the school has plans in place for students with special needs, and in many classrooms, teacher assistants called "Star Guides" are also on hand to help. He says there were star guides in the room during Friday's incident.


So I guess it would appear that special needs children are in the same classroom as regular children so long as they aren't severely mentally handicapped? Either way, that's a dumb poo policy.

#8 rodeo

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 01:27 PM

Yeah, they're lucky he just decided to climb a wall instead of another student. Everyone from the cop to the teacher to the parents are dumb-dumbs in this story.

#9 Darth Biscuit

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 01:47 PM

Idiot cop.

A kid who acts like that shouldn't be in regular school anyways.


You obviously don't know much about special ed kids...

I would need a few more details, I'll read the article later, but generally the cops aren't called unless a kid is threatening others. Also, most schools that deal with kids that have behavior disorders habe trained staff that can restrain them.

Sounds like the cop got hit and got pissed off... A generally bad situation.

#10 rodeo

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 02:00 PM

You're right, but I'm learning more since SuperMan started posting in the Tinderbox.

#11 GOOGLE RON PAUL

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 02:23 PM

"I asked to see my son. Forty-five minutes later, after they told me he did not need a parent present because he was under arrest and not being interrogated,” she said. “He was fingerprinted, photographed and booked for aggravated battery to a police officer.”


"It's a fine line whether you call it an arrest. He was a juvenile.He was not finger printed. He was not photographed with the mug shot camera. He was not taken into jail. He was taken into custody. He was brought to police headquarters where the appropriate paperwork was filled out so we could forward the reports to the probation department and then he was released to his mother," Copley said.


some conflicting reports here but yeah i don't really have a problem with this if he was just treated as a juvenile. it'd be nice if he didn't have to worry about having a juvenile record but this is the symptom of the problem, not the cause, which leads me to.....

"You just can't handle them like they are a regular gen-ed student,” she said. “They require special attention. And if anybody is going to be in that aspect and dealing with them, they need to have the proper training to deal with them before stepping into the classroom.”


this is the actual issue in this case as many schools lack the resources to deal with kids like this appropriately. then you get cases where teachers are calling the cops because they can't deal with the kids themselves

#12 Darth Biscuit

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 03:17 PM

Ok, read the article...

Sounds like the staff at this particular school is not properly trained to handle this student... So I'm not really surprised that they called the police.

It also sounds like if that officer has CIT, then he needs to retake it... Obviously all the details weren't related in the article, but it sounds like he didn't handle it properly. If the boy is autistic and has a behavioral disorder, then why arrest him, what good did that do except make the officer feel better?

My wife is trained in CIT, and has taught kids with BEH for almost 20 years... I'll show it to her and see what she says.

As far as him being in a regular ed class, that's pretty much the goal nowadays with all kids... Obviously It's not ideal for all handicapped kids, but inclusion is the deal now.. and as long as It's not a huge distraction, I'm ok with it. In NC they've pretty much done away with seclusion rooms and the like due to lawsuits.

Honestly I'm surprised at rodeo saying these kids shouldn't be in regular schools... Handicapped kids have a right to education too... And frankly their parents deserve a break...

#13 Darth Biscuit

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 03:49 PM

My wife says pretty much what I said, the school staff is undertrained and if that cop has CIT he missed the point, which is to avoid such injuries... If the kids climbing a wall, unless there's some imminent danger, you should just let them come down on their own, then deal with them.

Also, she said that seclusion rooms are fine in NC, as long as they follow prescribed guidelines.

#14 SuperMan

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 04:04 PM

You're right, but I'm learning more since SuperMan started posting in the Tinderbox.


You are quite funny.

I have a masters degree in business and I am a corporate communications manager for At&t.

But the great Rodeo says I'm challenged so it must be true.... ;)

#15 Panthers128

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 11:10 PM

The cop did his job. If you don't want this outcome, don't call a police officer. What was the cop supposed to do, give him a spanking and a good scolding? That kid kicked him in the face, he's lucky he didn't meet the taser. The cop used nonlethal force and he removed a problem.

You guys always want to bash cops. I see nothing wrong with what the cop did. The teacher felt threatened, the cop was assaulted. Stop with the sentimental feelings for the mentally ill. If your 9-year-old ended up assaulted by that loose cannon, then you'd be asking why the cop hadn't taken him away or why the teacher had not done more to remove the problem.


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