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James Harrison's Child Taken To Hospital After Dog Bite


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#31 mantal

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 02:05 PM

The three gentlest, most non-aggressive dogs I have ever known and I've known a lot of dog, were Pits. All three were female too I might add...

#32 tarheelblue89

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 02:09 PM

What was the kid doing to make the dog bite him????? Dumb kid.

#33 RWatson43

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 02:38 PM

Certain breeds have higher tendencies to do certain unprovoked behavior; PB's are one of them. They have more prey drive than most dogs. A lot of this has to do with what the original job of the dog back in the day. All dogs have it, some are not as pronounced as this breed and other similar breeds due to years of breeding. I have a 95lb Chesapeake Bay Retriever that I would not leave alone in a room with a small kid, small animal, or stranger. I can list a lot more breeds from personal experience. Handling and training of the any dog is important and responsibility should fall squarely on the shoulders of the owners that get dogs that involve a higher risk of aggressive behavior. What ever the kid was doing the situation should not have taken place. If there was a previous bite history on this dog or known to be more aggressive he should be charged and the dog taken.

#34 rayzor

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 02:54 PM

the stats don't lie...it doesn't matter how much you love pit bulls. they and rottweilers are responsible for well over half of all dog bite related fatalities and pit bulls on their own are responsible for a third of them all.

it doesn't matter how many of you weren't attacked by them and found them nice and friendly. they have killed more people than most other dogs.

#35 rayzor

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 02:55 PM

If you think it was done because it was a pitbull then you are stupid it's not the breed of a dog but how you raise it SH*t it could have been a collie if you raised it the wrong way.I have a pitbull that got beat up by the poodle next door this is no joke.Anyways do you know if the child was pulling on his tail or ears or anything like that?

you need to look at the research that shows how many fatalities were caused by pit bulls before you dismiss it.

#36 The Link

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 02:57 PM

the stats don't lie...it doesn't matter how much you love pit bulls. they and rottweilers are responsible for well over half of all dog bite related fatalities and pit bulls on their own are responsible for a third of them all.

it doesn't matter how many of you weren't attacked by them and found them nice and friendly. they have killed more people than most other dogs.


I'll bet the majority of those dogs weren't trained right or trained for the wrong purpose.

#37 mantal

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 03:00 PM

Certain breeds have higher tendencies to do certain unprovoked behavior; PB's are one of them. They have more prey drive than most dogs. A lot of this has to do with what the original job of the dog back in the day. All dogs have it, some are not as pronounced as this breed and other similar breeds due to years of breeding. I have a 95lb Chesapeake Bay Retriever that I would not leave alone in a room with a small kid, small animal, or stranger. I can list a lot more breeds from personal experience. Handling and training of the any dog is important and responsibility should fall squarely on the shoulders of the owners that get dogs that involve a higher risk of aggressive behavior. What ever the kid was doing the situation should not have taken place. If there was a previous bite history on this dog or known to be more aggressive he should be charged and the dog taken.


Don't blame you, it's a cool breed, but best not to take the chance. There are a lot of different forms of aggression. I had a buddy who used to come over with his Block Head Lab and I had to lock our dogs up when he came over or the Lab would jump them with full intent to kill. The Lab loved all people completely, but hated other dogs. As soon as they would drive up, the cats would hit the barn loft as well...

My ex-wife had a Rottweiler. Though normally very friendly, if you looked it in the eyes for more than a fleeting glimpse, it would start to become aggressive. It sensed it as a challenge.

I used to work at a pet shop when a teenager and there was a Chow Chow puppy there that I thought was pretty cool, so I let him have the run of the store while I was getting ready to open. One day, he crapped on the floor and I decided to start housebreaking and put his nose in it and cracked him with a rolled up newspaper. He went into attack mode. Meanwhile, the same buddy as below had a wife that owned an adult completely white Chow Chow. She hated most people, but would follow me all over the place craving attention to the complete drop jaw amazement of her owner.

My buddy had a Pit named Gypsy that he took over to a friend's house when I was there. Their 3 year old chased Gypsy around for 4 hours pulling on her ears, he tail, hitting her, we couldn't stop him from doing it. That dog never once acted in any aggressive manner whatsoever, she just took it. She was raised right...

#38 Skew

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 03:06 PM

Did they take his child to the hospital by plane?


Some days, it's not even worth trying.

#39 mantal

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 03:07 PM

you need to look at the research that shows how many fatalities were caused by pit bulls before you dismiss it.




What all those statistics don't show is how many of those dogs guilty of fatalities were caused by people who got the dogs to be macho and raised them to be aggressive. I'd be willing to wager that the percentage would be extremely high. I've been around probably 100+ Pits, Chow Chows, Block Head Labs and Rotts, etc. and never found one to be in the least aggressive. But then again, their owners weren't macho types who raised them to be that way...

#40 nosuchthingasapanther

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 03:31 PM

certain people shouldn't own certain dogs.

it's never the animal's fault. it's the people who have no idea what it takes and aren't dedicated enough to properly handle certain breeds.

the same people who have pit bulls that bite are the same people who will have chihuahuas that bite.

to this day i still can't believe that there's such a thing as a vicious rottweiler. they're like boxers. they're like big kids that want to play with everything all the time and have no idea how strong they really are.

#41 RWatson43

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 04:04 PM

Mintal I agree,
I have had more dogs in the house and in for training and evaluations than most people could imagine. I have had most if not all of the black listed dogs at the house. They all have a trigger that would cause some type of aggression, but it is up to the owners to not allow that trigger to be pulled or put the dog in a situation that it can happen. Owners responsibility! With the above mentioned stats, it does not take into account like others have mentioned the owner/ handlers stupidity when dealing with a dog and the actions leading up to the incidents. They are just numbers and unfortunantly those breeds attract the owners that do not need them. If it was a toy breed or even a popular breed (lab/golden/collie) that bit a high profile players kid it probably would not be news or a big deal or be taken down as a statistic.

#42 PowerlessDan

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 04:11 PM

Some days, it's not even worth trying.


Don't give up we appreciate all your efforts.

#43 mantal

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 04:19 PM

Don't give up we appreciate all your efforts.




Huh?

#44 stevesmith3428

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 04:21 PM

He didnt want them to take his kid to the hospital because he thinks they would have taken any other kid if they gotten bitten too.

#45 Go To Girl

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 04:43 PM

My ex-wife had a Rottweiler. Though normally very friendly, if you looked it in the eyes for more than a fleeting glimpse, it would start to become aggressive. It sensed it as a challenge.


My brother had a chow that attacked me because I looked it in the eye after it had gone and killed a rabbit. They lived out in the country and it was clear across the yard (a very big yard) and I called to it. When I called him, he looked me in the eyes and just charged. I thank God for the trampoline in their yard. My leg bled for a full day from just one bite. Would have been more bites if not for the trampoline. I think the dog thought I wanted his rabbit. I didn't know at the time he had a rabbit - he was well over 100 yards away from me.

Before that day, that dog was the sweetest dog.........


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