Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Lake Providence, LA. The largest wealth gap in the world?


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 Kurb

Kurb

    I hit it.

  • Administrators
  • 13,563 posts
  • LocationILM

Posted 30 October 2013 - 08:20 AM

http://www.cnn.com/2....html?hpt=hp_t1

 

 

This is a thoroughly fascinating article and I suggest everyone take their morning coffee/poop break and read it. 

Are there people out there that want to milk the system?  Yeah but I'm coming around more and more tho that there are even more folks that are willing to walk to McDonalds 15 miles one way. 

 

Please share your thoughts.



#2 cookinwithgas

cookinwithgas

    Grey Poupon Elitest Trash

  • ALL-PRO
  • 23,317 posts

Posted 30 October 2013 - 08:35 AM

Place clearly needs a bootstrap factory

#3 Happy Panther

Happy Panther

    Now even funnier.

  • ALL-PRO
  • 17,543 posts

Posted 30 October 2013 - 09:49 AM

Here is the biggest issue

 

A dozen or so family members rely on her for financial support. 

 

 

The article doesn't comment on what the daughter does or tries to do for a living or how many exactly of this dozen are adults. But there isn't enough government assistance that is going to allow this family to move up.



#4 Peppers90 NC

Peppers90 NC

    Senior Member

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,746 posts

Posted 30 October 2013 - 10:11 AM

Here is the biggest issue

 

 

The article doesn't comment on what the daughter does or tries to do for a living or how many exactly of this dozen are adults. But there isn't enough government assistance that is going to allow this family to move up.

i have a huge problem with poor people having too many kids, but i guess if the govment gonna pay them to have kids, they will keep doing it.  the government shouldnt have help this family of however many move up, they were the ones being irresponsible having children they cant afford.

 

two-sided coin- repubs dont want abortion or planned parenthood, but they dont want to pay for the poor people's children.

 

and dem's are just enablers. 

 

if the government started taxing people for having more than two kids, then there possibly wouldnt be so much poverty, just my ignorant opinion.



#5 catfang

catfang

    Senior Member

  • ALL-PRO
  • 6,348 posts

Posted 30 October 2013 - 11:27 AM

Here is the biggest issue

 

 

The article doesn't comment on what the daughter does or tries to do for a living or how many exactly of this dozen are adults. But there isn't enough government assistance that is going to allow this family to move up.

 

I was going to make a similar comment.  A common theme I saw was teenage pregnancies. Continues to be a major problem and contributor to conditions that lead to poverty. 



#6 thefuzz

thefuzz

    coppin a feel

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,334 posts

Posted 31 October 2013 - 02:24 PM

I read that, and I come from an area that is quickly becoming that, and the one thing that always jumps out at me is family.

 

Single parent households and teen pregnancy, those are tough odds to beat.

 

Lack of education usually follows up teen pregnancy, and the odds get tougher.

 

My parents put the fear of God into me about getting a girl pregnant, and how tough my life would be....I have never forgotten those talks.



#7 PanthersFanNY

PanthersFanNY

    Senior Member

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,658 posts

Posted 31 October 2013 - 02:39 PM

Multiple generations having multiple teenage pregnancies will keep families in poverty. I wonder how many on the rich side of the lake have half a dozen bastards running around.



#8 Happy Panther

Happy Panther

    Now even funnier.

  • ALL-PRO
  • 17,543 posts

Posted 31 October 2013 - 02:52 PM

Was wondering if Lake Providence had a Walmart and they have 2 about 10 miles away. 

 

But basically there is no industry in this town except farming and a factory or two. The working population are too encumbered by poverty and children to move so are trapped.

 

Solutions:

 

1) Wealth Transfer - raise taxes on the rich give it to the poor.

2) Schooling - I grew up as poor as some of these people but I won the lottery in that my parents were very educated and demanded that I would be the same

3) Education - Don't have babies out of wedlock, don't do drugs, stay in school.

4) Travel - Get out of your hometown somehow. Not just the poor but the number of buddies I have who are lower middle class who rarely leave the county are staggering

 

What else?

 

 



#9 PhillyB

PhillyB

    that jungle football

  • ALL-PRO
  • 20,495 posts
  • Locationthird spur east of the sun

Posted 31 October 2013 - 04:41 PM

Was wondering if Lake Providence had a Walmart and they have 2 about 10 miles away. 

 

But basically there is no industry in this town except farming and a factory or two. The working population are too encumbered by poverty and children to move so are trapped.

 

Solutions:

 

1) Wealth Transfer - raise taxes on the rich give it to the poor.

2) Schooling - I grew up as poor as some of these people but I won the lottery in that my parents were very educated and demanded that I would be the same

3) Education - Don't have babies out of wedlock, don't do drugs, stay in school.

4) Travel - Get out of your hometown somehow. Not just the poor but the number of buddies I have who are lower middle class who rarely leave the county are staggering

 

What else?

 

IMO poverty is cyclical, often generationally-inherited, and implicitly behavioral, and therefore largely cultural. given this, these solutions would have to be externally inserted into a given situation: it cannot be simply hoped that an individual caught in cyclical poverty and the culture that surrounds it will suddenly independently realize that he should travel out of his hometown and become educated. 

 

by one means or another, individuals caught up in these cycles must be pulled out of it, or given a hand up at the very least.

 

unfortunately a large portion of americans see this as socialism and will squawk endlessly about the downfall of america and the punishment of the rich for being successful, so it's unlikely national dialogue will ever reach a place where much is done on a national scale.



#10 Hawk

Hawk

    Huddler of the Decade

  • Moderators
  • 14,979 posts

Posted 31 October 2013 - 04:49 PM

I've been to Louisianna a couple of times and that was the one thing that really jumped out at me...the extreme division between the rich and the poor.  I don't remember for sure the road...maybe it's St. Charles Ave?????  Anyway....Tulane, Loyola, massive estates all the way down a beautifully manicured 4 lane road...you get to the T intersection at the end and head back up the very next block and it's like you are in the slums.  Every city has it of course, I'm just not sure I've ever seen such an extreme transition.



#11 Kitten Diver

Kitten Diver

    SENIOR HUDDLER

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,824 posts

Posted 31 October 2013 - 05:33 PM

Downtown Charleston SC has such a transition. Million dollar homes 4 homes down from yet to be evacuated slums. I don't see how those people live so close to the poor all while flaunting their wealth.

#12 Davidson Deac II

Davidson Deac II

    Senior Member

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,019 posts

Posted 31 October 2013 - 06:51 PM

Downtown Charleston SC has such a transition. Million dollar homes 4 homes down from yet to be evacuated slums. I don't see how those people live so close to the poor all while flaunting their wealth.


I got the impression that much of the low country was that way. Big mansions next to shacks.

#13 Carolina Husker

Carolina Husker

    I hate football

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,503 posts

Posted 31 October 2013 - 06:59 PM

 

A dozen or so family members rely on her for financial support. Her daughter, who has three children, lives across the street in a trailer so leaky that, despite her efforts to tar the roof to prevent rain from seeping through, it has mushrooms growing from the ceiling, like something out of "Alice in Wonderland." Stray dogs hound her door.

 

I wonder why money is tight.

 

It's obviously that those evil rich folk across the lake aren't paying their fair share. Louisiana should definitely raise taxes.



#14 Chimera

Chimera

    Membrane

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,791 posts

Posted 31 October 2013 - 07:18 PM

IMO poverty is cyclical, often generationally-inherited, and implicitly behavioral, and therefore largely cultural. given this, these solutions would have to be externally inserted into a given situation: it cannot be simply hoped that an individual caught in cyclical poverty and the culture that surrounds it will suddenly independently realize that he should travel out of his hometown and become educated.

by one means or another, individuals caught up in these cycles must be pulled out of it, or given a hand up at the very least.

unfortunately a large portion of americans see this as socialism and will squawk endlessly about the downfall of america and the punishment of the rich for being successful, so it's unlikely national dialogue will ever reach a place where much is done on a national scale.


the first two-thirds of this are spot on, a trillion percent correct.

The last paragraph, well, I don't know anyone, conservative, liberal, or other, who would call a program "socialist." A program that actually works and produces positive results will not be argued like so many existing programs that produce nothing and encourage dependence on welfare programs. There is a difference.

#15 pstall

pstall

    Gazebo Effect

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,955 posts
  • LocationMontford

Posted 31 October 2013 - 07:42 PM

Solve the teen preg issue and an amazing turn of events happen.


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Shop at Amazon Contact Us: info@carolinahuddle.com