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WOW!!

Member Since 10 Oct 2013
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Topics I've Started

Gerald Green was mention as a target for us on BR..

14 December 2014 - 11:27 PM

Would you trade Lance for Green??

Cam needs Help story from BR.

04 December 2014 - 09:17 PM

Since some people feel the need to post all the crappy opinions and articles about Cam. I thought I'd post some reality.

So some of you arm chair Qb guru's can truly understand the situation in which Cam was put in this season.

 

This article comes with some nice still picks and analysis as well.

 

 

http://bleacherrepor...uery=Cam Newton

 

Cam Newton is having quite the career so far.

The former Auburn quarterback became the first overall pick of the 2011 draft just a few months after winning the National Championship. During his debut for the Carolina Panthers, he threw for an incredible 422 yards, the most for any player making his professional debut.

From there, Newton went on to break the record for rushing touchdowns with 14, and he accounted for 35 total scores as a rookie.

By all measures, the beginning to Newton's career was simply phenomenal. He was a 4,000-yard passer who carried his offense by completing 60 percent of his 517 pass attempts. Newton had significantly more total touchdowns than total turnovers, and he did all of this while playing with an underwhelming supporting cast.

Over his next two seasons, Newton's numbers didn't get better but his overall level of play as a quarterback was heading in the right direction.

The early years of Newton's career peaked last season, when he played a major role in guiding the Panthers back to the playoffs. His career was on the right trajectory, as he turned from an incredibly explosive rookie who made a few too many mistakes to a less explosive, but much more efficient overall, quarterback in his third season.


Cam needs Help story from BR.

04 December 2014 - 09:15 PM

Since some people feel the need to post all the crappy opinions and articles about Cam. I thought I'd post some reality.

So some of you arm chair Qb guru's can truly understand the situation in which Cam was put in this season.

 

This article comes with some nice still picks and analysis as well.

 

 

http://bleacherrepor...uery=Cam Newton

 

Cam Newton is having quite the career so far.

The former Auburn quarterback became the first overall pick of the 2011 draft just a few months after winning the National Championship. During his debut for the Carolina Panthers, he threw for an incredible 422 yards, the most for any player making his professional debut.

From there, Newton went on to break the record for rushing touchdowns with 14, and he accounted for 35 total scores as a rookie.

By all measures, the beginning to Newton's career was simply phenomenal. He was a 4,000-yard passer who carried his offense by completing 60 percent of his 517 pass attempts. Newton had significantly more total touchdowns than total turnovers, and he did all of this while playing with an underwhelming supporting cast.

Over his next two seasons, Newton's numbers didn't get better but his overall level of play as a quarterback was heading in the right direction.

The early years of Newton's career peaked last season, when he played a major role in guiding the Panthers back to the playoffs. His career was on the right trajectory, as he turned from an incredibly explosive rookie who made a few too many mistakes to a less explosive, but much more efficient overall, quarterback in his third season.

Now, in Newton's fourth season, he's enduring more adversity than ever before.

His two most important teammates on the offensive side, starting left tackle Jordan Gross and starting wide receiver Steve Smith, both left the team. Gross wasn't adequately replaced, while Smith's absence was filled with a talented, but so far inconsistent rookie.

The Panthers essentially rebuilt Newton's whole supporting cast in the offseason to leave him with an inadequate offensive line and a severely limited group of receivers. To worsen matters, Newton himself had offseason surgery that took away his preparation. That lack of preparation affected his relationship with his new receivers and his own individual ability to perform.

While playing with this revamped cast, Newton is completing just 57.9 percent of his passes for 2,586 yards and 13 touchdowns. He has 15 total touchdowns and 16 total turnovers.

Stretches during the season have existed when Newton has played very well, masking the flaws of the offense around him, but for the most part, he has struggled. Generally, Newton has been put in a situation that simply made it impossible for him to be efficient or productive.

As Mark Sanchez of the Philadelphia Eagles is highlighting this season, a quarterback's situation is vital for his performance.

Even the very best quarterbacks in the NFL can't succeed without either a strong cast of wide receivers or a strong offensive line. Good quarterbacks can throw receivers open with anticipation and accuracy, or they can overcome an overwhelmed offensive line with quick decisions, quick throws and/or pocket movement.

If a quarterback is required to do both, the chances of him being productive plummet. Eli Manning learned this last season when the whole responsibility of moving the ball through the air was placed on his shoulders. Manning tallied a huge number of turnovers despite not playing awful individual football.

As a veteran quarterback who has spent most of his career in tough situations, Manning's struggles weren't really a concern for the long term.

With Newton, the long term is the greatest concern right now. Newton is only 25 years of age and has shown signs of regression in recent weeks. In particular, his pocket management has suffered as he continues to take too many hits and play behind offensive linemen who can't sustain their blocks.

This was highlighted early on against the Minnesota Vikings last week.

 

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NFL.com

 

In previous seasons, Newton has shown the ability to step up in the pocket while keeping his eyes downfield to make throws. He isn't the type of quarterback who has lacked subtlety with his movement in the pocket or been over anxious to get rid of the football.

On his first third down of the Vikings game, the regression in this area was put on show.

 

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Credit: NFL.com

 

A common trait for quarterbacks who are put under too much pressure by their offensive lines is to start feeling pressure that isn't there. On this play, Newton feels the initial pressure off of the right side of his line when he reaches the top of his drop.

Newton steps forward into the pocket of space in front of him, but he shows very little control of his movement.

 

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Credit: NFL.com

 

When Newton arrives in the space in front of him, he drops into a crouch, which puts his feet spread wide in line with each other. This isn't a position he can throw the ball from. Furthermore, Newton's eyes drop to the pressure around him instead of looking for his receivers down the field.

This isn't a case of Newton's line immediately swallowing him up when he stepped forward. He had the time to stand tall and deliver the ball downfield before the defenders closed on him.

Instead of doing that, he held the ball between the tackles before the defenders eventually got to him. Newton wasn't given good protection on this play because his right tackle was beaten so quickly, but it was the kind of pressure you'd expect him to adjust to.

Because the Vikings were able to get pressure with just four pass-rushers, Newton's receivers down the field couldn't create any separation in crowded coverage.

Therefore, even if Newton does adjust properly, he would likely only be checking the ball down to his open underneath receiver who wasn't in position to gain a first down on this 3rd-and-8. Giving up pressure against four defenders is a major problem for any quarterback.

An offensive line that gives up quick pressure to just four pass-rushers forces its quarterback to fit the ball into very tight windows down the field. Sometimes even those tight windows aren't available, making it impossible to make any kind of positive play.

 

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Credit: NFL.com

 

On this play, Newton has three free rushers closing on him in the pocket. He has nowhere to go with the football, so he needs to make a quick throw. As the image shows, none of his receivers are even in their routes at this point of the play.

These aren't unusual plays for Newton; they are typical of the offense he is expected to perform in.

 

 

Part of this analysis from Pro Football Focus can be blamed on Newton's pocket movement, but overwhelmingly, the fault is of his offensive line. Newton's offensive line is giving him so little protection that even when it does perform effectively, he doesn't trust it.

When Newton does make positive plays from the pocket, he isn't helped by his wide receivers or the design of his offense.

 

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Credit: NFL.com

 

On this 2nd-and-6 play, the Panthers come out with a receiver wide to either side of the field. There is also a fullback offset to the right with a tight end ahead of him. Predictably, the Vikings come out in their base 4-3 formation.

It's important to note that the Vikings cornerbacks are in press coverage outside.

 

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Credit: NFL.com

 

Offensive coordinator Mike Shula uses play action while sending his tight end into a route down the field and his fullback into the right flat. The tight end is running an eight yard in route, while the fullback is running into the flat.

Most importantly, the outside receivers are simply running curl routes.

 

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Credit: NFL.com

 

Newton should have audibled out of this play. It was never going to give him an open receiver to find, save for the fullback in the flat. However, more important than Newton's lack of an audible at the line is the overall design of the play.

The routes on this play are all individual routes. They don't cross each other or relate to each other in such a way that they will exploit any coverage the defense calls. Furthermore, Newton doesn't have a single option running deep down the field despite using play action.

Newton's arm talent is phenomenal, and he shows it off with precision on his deep passes.

However, the offense he plays in doesn't show off an ability to create favorable deep shots, while the receivers he works with don't have that kind of athleticism for the most part. Save for Benjamin, Newton doesn't have an impressive athlete working outside.

Even Benjamin has his physical limitations, and his overall ability as a receiver is a problem. Benjamin may become more consistent as his career develops, but right now he lacks the ability to fight for the ball against physical coverage, and his hands are inconsistent.

In just the first half of the Vikings game, Benjamin failed to make three receptions that he should have made.

 

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Credit: NFL.com

 

The first came midway through the first quarter, as Newton threw Benjamin open with a perfectly placed back-shoulder throw when he ran a route down the sideline. Benjamin didn't create any separation against the cornerback covering him.

He was able to adjust to the football, but he failed to prevent the ball from bouncing off of his hands.

 

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Credit: NFL.com

 

The second play initially looks like an overthrow from Newton, but when you focus more on Benjamin through his route, you notice that he doesn't run through the play. When Benjamin comes infield, he is hesitant. That is seemingly because of the aggressive coverage of the arriving defensive back.

Instead of making a relatively simple catch by running through the ball, Benjamin meagerly reaches one hand out toward the football.

 

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Credit: NFL.com

 

After failing to make that play, Newton gives Benjamin a chance to make another soon after on the same drive. This time the receiver lines up in the slot and runs a crossing route. He gets good positioning on the defensive back covering him, and Newton delivers an accurate pass.

However, Benjamin does work through the ball or reach out to it with his hands. He waits for it to get into his chest, allowing the ball to bounce off of his chest as the defensive back contacts him.

This is Newton's best wide receiver. This is the receiver that the Panthers brought in to replace Steve Smith instead of adding him as a second option. Even while Benjamin has struggled through his rookie season, Newton still has to rely on him because of the lack of receiving options the Panthers have given him.

It's undeniable that Cam Newton is having a poor season. It's also clear that he has regressed since last season.

That's not surprising, though. Newton never really had a chance to be an effective quarterback this season. His own injury situation combined with the offense around him would be enough to drag down any quarterback at this level.

He is under contract moving into the 2015 season, and any gyrations the Panthers make this offseason or next about not signing Newton long term because of his play should be ignored.

Newton is as talented a quarterback as you will find. His skill set offers the offense a lot more than most quarterbacks in the league when he is healthy. He has performed to a high level and sustained his consistency when given a viable group of players to work with.

Evaluating him for the long term in this kind of situation is simply unfair and unwise.

Instead of using this season to try and squeeze pennies from Newton's contract, the Panthers should be focusing on rectifying the issues that the team has around him. It's unlikely that they can build a championship-caliber roster in one season, as they need offensive linemen, wide receivers, a running back or two and a slate of defensive backs.

One of the few positions they shouldn't feel compelled to address is quarterback.


Can Clifford draw up a play for anybody other then Kemba.?

23 November 2014 - 08:33 PM

Just a question.

You would think somebody else can have the ball in their hands at the end of the game..

Also his 4th qrt. Calls are starting to suck..

OC candidates.

21 November 2014 - 02:46 PM

Imo Rivera gets another season but Shula is a scapegoat and will be gone.

So what are a few OC candidates we can look at this off season?

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