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MHS831

Member Since 08 Jun 2010
Offline Last Active Today, 06:14 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: bersin ......here comes your chance son

Today, 06:17 PM

If he gets 50 yards, he would surpass Steve Smith's per game average last year.


In Topic: 9/19 practice tweets

Today, 10:10 AM

DeAngelo signed a lucrative contract at a position where RBs are devalued.  I think the hate is for Hurney, after signing DW and Stewie to huge contracts while ignoring WR.


In Topic: The Greg Hardy thread....for everything Hardy related

Yesterday, 04:27 PM

How I see this

 

There are a bunch of things that are confusing people, making this more complex than it really is.  First of all, Hardy is not exactly as innocent as many of you think, if you read the law.  Assault is not necessarily hitting a person, it is the intentional, realistic threat of harm one person uses against another.   Since I do not pretend to know the details, nor should any of you, I can say that, from what I have heard about the case, there was a threat of harm.  If he had access to a collection of assault weapons, for example, and intimidated her in any way with them, then he is guilty of assault.  If he hit her, then he is guilty of battery.

 

The other thing that confuses people is the fact that they think the NFL has to have a proven violation of the law to discipline a player.  Not so.  If Hardy's conduct was in any way damaging to the reputation of the Panthers and the league, either party can discipline him. These players are backed by a union headed by lawyers-it happens all the time.  However, the NFL has been relatively soft in terms of discipline because it usually leads to a big ordeal with the union lawyers, so they have been passive.  Now, however, the public outcry is so strong, it outweighs the temper tantrums of the players' union, so we are where we are.  So Hardy's punishment is not necessarily determined by his innocence or guilt in a court of law, but by the manner in which his voluntary actions are viewed in terms of his contract and the agreement between the NFL and the Players' Union. Guessing that the threats from major sponsors to clean this up, coinciding with the statements of political leaders and major media outlets, it is no longer an internal matter. 

 

This is how I understand this.  I have taught education law to perspective principals, and was in the dark about the difference between assault and battery.  I am not a lawyer and am learning as we go as everyone else. 

 

Hardy makes $770k per week, so I don't imagine his team of lawyers will have any difficulty getting him off vs. some low-paid district attorney.  


In Topic: So who gets the roster spot?

Yesterday, 12:05 PM

Assuming you believe he's a better player. 

 

He wouldn't know the offense very well at all, though.  How do you deal with that?

 

I think he could be a different player--not sure about better.  I am guessing he can't pass block well--based on the reason most young RBs with talent struggle early and his college experience.  

 

Having said that, maybe they could teach him some screen packages--sweeps, draws, etc.  However, I am not sure I would have him in there with Cam throwing the ball with the RB in to pick up the blitz.

 

That is all speculation.


In Topic: Mike Mitchell talks about playing the Panthers

Yesterday, 11:54 AM

If I am a pro athlete, I take the $ on that second contract--it is usually the biggest.  The third contract, should you get one, should be based on your feelings and other factors, like schools for your kids, teammates, etc.


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