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Davidson Deac II

Member Since 24 Nov 2008
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 09:36 PM
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#3221645 Now Trey Gowdy is part of the Beeennnggaaazzziiii conspiracy

Posted by Davidson Deac II on Yesterday, 03:02 PM

i saw a "remember benghazi" sticker on a minivan yesterday… lol

 

I saw a deadhead sticker on a Cadillac. 




#3221632 let's talk about chris kyle

Posted by Davidson Deac II on Yesterday, 02:51 PM

Religion must be defined by the person referring to it as an entity in order to be conjured as a "myth." I will disagree simply because the term "war" is not defined, the interpretation of religious versus ethnic is not defined and, of course, the vast majority of people will associate "wars" with the Civil, WW1, WW2, Korea and maybe 1812 and the Frech-Indian War thrown in, only because they involved this country.

 

For example, I consider the nationalist movement associated with Germany in WW2 as a kind of modern religion. It contains a sort of spiritual aspect that lend to its most extreme manifestation a desire to "purify" the nation of "alien" groups.

 

Bosnia is yet another case where the word "ethnic" cleansing was used, but just as easily could have been "religious" cleansing as there were, again, spiritual aspects used as the basis.

 

http://www.foreignaf...thnic-cleansing

Once these ancient empires had rent the organic links among ethnicity, belief and political citizenship, religion became the primary basis of collective identity. In the Middle Ages cleansing was thus applied primarily to religious, as opposed to ethnic, minorities, as medieval Christianity attempted to impose orthodoxy on nonbelievers. Despite prior episodes of religious suppression, such as early Christians in Rome or the persecution of non-Zoroastrians in Persia in the fourth century, it was only during the Middle Ages that persecution of religious minorities became fully institutionalized for substantial periods.

Massacre and expulsion were the most common methods of religious cleansing, which tended to target Jews, the only sizable minority in most countries. Jews were thus expelled from England (1290), France (1306), Hungary (1349-1360), Provence (1394 and 1490), Austria (1421), Lithuania (1445), Cracow (1494), Portugal (1497) and numerous German principalities at various times. Spain was unique among European countries because of its sizable Muslim population. Having "tried" massacre in 1391, Spain expelled its Jews in 1492, then its Muslims in 1502, forcibly Christianizing the remaining Muslims in 1526 and finally expelling all Moriscos (converted Muslims) in 1609-14.

 

In 1530 the Confession of Augsburg had explicitly laid down the principle of religious homogeneity as the basis of political order. Cuius regio, eius religio meant in effect that medieval states had begun to shape an orthodox citizenry. Thus by revoking the Edict of Nantes in 1685, France indeed initiated a process of "self-cleansing," as thousands of Protestant Huguenots fled once denied freedom of worship. In this way, the Confession can be considered the ideological cornerstone of modern cleansing, a process only possible in centralized, absolutist states capable of enforcing "purity."

 

The earliest example was cleansing carried out by Tiglath-Pileser III (745-727 bc), the first Assyrian ruler to make forced resettlement a state policy. Under his reign about half the population of a conquered land would be carried off, and its place taken by settlers from another region. Tiglath's heirs continued this policy and, over the centuries, so too did the Babylonians, Greeks and Romans, although not always on the same scale and often for the prevailing economic reason of slavery.

Once these ancient empires had rent the organic links among ethnicity, belief and political citizenship, religion became the primary basis of collective identity. In the Middle Ages cleansing was thus applied primarily to religious, as opposed to ethnic, minorities, as medieval Christianity attempted to impose orthodoxy on nonbelievers. Despite prior episodes of religious suppression, such as early Christians in Rome or the persecution of non-Zoroastrians in Persia in the fourth century, it was only during the Middle Ages that persecution of religious minorities became fully institutionalized for substantial periods.

Massacre and expulsion were the most common methods of religious cleansing, which tended to target Jews, the only sizable minority in most countries. Jews were thus expelled from England (1290), France (1306), Hungary (1349-1360), Provence (1394 and 1490), Austria (1421), Lithuania (1445), Cracow (1494), Portugal (1497) and numerous German principalities at various times. Spain was unique among European countries because of its sizable Muslim population. Having "tried" massacre in 1391, Spain expelled its Jews in 1492, then its Muslims in 1502, forcibly Christianizing the remaining Muslims in 1526 and finally expelling all Moriscos (converted Muslims) in 1609-14.

 

In 1530 the Confession of Augsburg had explicitly laid down the principle of religious homogeneity as the basis of political order. Cuius regio, eius religio meant in effect that medieval states had begun to shape an orthodox citizenry. Thus by revoking the Edict of Nantes in 1685, France indeed initiated a process of "self-cleansing," as thousands of Protestant Huguenots fled once denied freedom of worship. In this way, the Confession can be considered the ideological cornerstone of modern cleansing, a process only possible in centralized, absolutist states capable of enforcing "purity."

 

Although still couched in religious terms, the first cleansings based primarily on ethnic discrimination were carried out by England. In the 1640s and 1650s, when war and plague swept away half the Irish population, England seized the opportunity to expel most of the remaining Irish Catholics from Ulster until, by 1688, 80 percent of their land was owned by English and Scottish Protestants. London's motivation was primarily strategic: to prevent Catholic Ireland from offering Catholic Spain or France a base of operations. Displacement of the Irish population thus completed a kind of historical cycle, as cleansing returned to patterns formerly established by the Assyrians and Romans.

 

War: A state of armed conflict between different nations or states or different groups within a nation or state.

 

Religion:  The belief in and worship of a superhuman controlling power, especially a personal God or gods.

 

There, now they are both defined. 

 

I mentioned WWII and WWI because they are generally considered to two of the bloodiest wars in history and they involved nations across the globe.   Here is one list of the bloodiest, and as you see most of the wars listed are not US.  Fwiw, I didn't deny that religion based war happened, I only argued against the point that religion produced the bloodiest wars.  Historically speaking, the vast majority of religious wars occur on a scale to small to be considered among the bloodiest.

 

But if you are going to say that Nazism was a religion, then I think you are stretching the definition of religion and religious wars.

 

 




#3221214 let's talk about chris kyle

Posted by Davidson Deac II on Yesterday, 09:17 AM

And considering the bloodiest and most violent of conflicts have been in defense of or advancing the notion of one religious belief over another, one could then surmise that religion in general is immoral.

 

 

Its a myth that the bloodiest wars are religion based.  Religion in and of itself is neither moral nor immoral.  The people behind it are what determine whether it is moral or immoral.  Religion is simply a tool that can be used for good or bad.  Remove religion from the equation, and those that want war will find anouther reason.

 

War is generally violent and bloody regardless of the reason. If you look at wars in the 20th century, religious beliefs played a minor role at best, and Wars still happened and they were generally the most violent and bloody in history.  The most bloody and violent conflict in world history was World War II, and that war had little to do with religion. It had a lot to do with politics, racism and belief in racial superiority.   World War I was about empire building, with the Muslim Ottoman's on the same side as Christian Germany, while Othodox Russia, Catholic France, and Protestant England were on the other side. 




#3220275 We should all be thankful we living in this great nation

Posted by Davidson Deac II on 26 January 2015 - 08:20 AM

Europe is getting little bit unstable right now with anti-Islamic movements, terrorist attacks and economic slowdown.

 

I think the terrorist part is a little overblown.  Europe has had terrorist attacks before, and life still goes on. 




#3220274 We should all be thankful we living in this great nation

Posted by Davidson Deac II on 26 January 2015 - 08:18 AM

And plenty of spots in the Middle East, Africa, Central or South America...

 

I don't agree.

 

Can't think of any place in the Middle East (except perhaps Israel), that has the degree of personal freedom as most Western nations do.  I lived in Bahrain for a year.  Bahrain is one of the more liberal nations in the Middle East, and even there, personal freedom is far more limited than what we are use to in the US.  Economic opportunity does exist in some areas in Central and South America, but not to the degree it does in nations such as the US, Japan, Australia, etc...




#3220091 Now Trey Gowdy is part of the Beeennnggaaazzziiii conspiracy

Posted by Davidson Deac II on 25 January 2015 - 10:44 PM

Any relation to Curt Gowdy? 




#3220084 let's talk about chris kyle

Posted by Davidson Deac II on 25 January 2015 - 10:33 PM

Went to see it today and I don't see what the big deal is about.  Haven't read the book (and I wont) but if the events in the movie are accurate (and that is a big if), he was a hero to the men covered and their families.  If a man shoots someone who was about to kill me, then he is a hero to me.  Same with the corpsman who comes running into fire to patch me up.  Or my buddy who lays down covering fire so the corpsman can pull me out.  That's the way it is in war. 

 

The movie certainly didn't glorify war.  It seem to try to show the effect that war has upon the soldiers who fight and how much trouble they have adapting to normal life afterwards. If anything, any leader should watch that movie and take pause to consider the tremendous impact the decision to go to war will have on those who have to do the fighting, and on those who get caught in the fighting. 




#3215094 Don't complain about Richardson when Nascar does this

Posted by Davidson Deac II on 20 January 2015 - 08:53 PM

The only true sports are Bull Fighting, Mountain Climbing and Motor racing, everything else is just a game. 




#3214611 Rivera and Dave showed up to CJ's grandmother funeral.

Posted by Davidson Deac II on 20 January 2015 - 02:12 PM

no offense to you OP, but seriously who the fug takes a picture at a funeral of two people paying their respects. some things need to be left in private. 

 

 

Its a nice sign of respect. Photos at funerals are pretty bad though.

 

Went to a funeral last week and they were taking pictures of all the visitors and even the deceased.  Freaked me out a little, but apparently its an accepted practice in some cultures.   And they post them on facebook so family members that were not able to attend can see. 




#3214320 Romney going in a different direction

Posted by Davidson Deac II on 20 January 2015 - 09:14 AM

http://www.msnbc.com...-the-quiet-room


Well he doesn't have any actual ideas yet but by golly he's going to help you out.
 

 

He should definitely appeal to a large segment of Obama supporters then. 




#3212333 AFC championship game thread....

Posted by Davidson Deac II on 18 January 2015 - 09:53 PM

IMO, people often confuse individual accomplishments with team accomplishments.  Take Wilson or Kaepernick and put them on Tampa Bay, and we never hear about them except the two times a year we play them. 




#3211262 The NFC Championship Game Thread....

Posted by Davidson Deac II on 18 January 2015 - 06:32 PM

The NFL overtime system sucks.  Green Bay should get the ball at least once in overtime. 

 

Still great comeback by Seattle. 




#3210860 The NFC Championship Game Thread....

Posted by Davidson Deac II on 18 January 2015 - 05:54 PM

Wilson certainly didn't play well, but Green Bay's defense has been exceptional. 




#3210765 The NFC Championship Game Thread....

Posted by Davidson Deac II on 18 January 2015 - 05:42 PM

Well, Green Bay learned its lesson.  They rushed four that time. 




#3208705 Wireless Routers

Posted by Davidson Deac II on 17 January 2015 - 10:05 AM

can u explain to me what this means

 

It basically means bandwidth.  Time Warner and other providers sell you a certain amount of bandwidth.  The more you pay, the more you get.  Bigger pipe size means stuff gets to you faster.  Irt pipe size, think of a water pipe.  The bigger the pipe, the more water can flow thru it.  But there are still bottlenecks along the way.  Backbone routers, switches, network firewalls, etc... as well as your own home network/router which can also be a bottleneck. 






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