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RPO Overreaction...?


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2 minutes ago, davos said:

I think RPO had its benefits and I don’t get why it’s a dog when so many NFL offenses have incorporated its concepts into the modern schemes.

I’m a bit high on the koolaid right now but it’s also because there’s a food chance Corral can be put in a good position to succeed. Not so much in thinking he’s some rockstar but he could have the tools that fit the guys we have.

 

The big IF this year is whether we can actually run the ball effectively? IF we can. That RPO is just that much more potent. I am excited for the possibilities.

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4 hours ago, thunderraiden said:

I cared until 2011, thats all anyone would talk about being a downside of Newton coming out and I bought into it. Newton wasn't the foregone conclusion at #1 like people want to believe, there were a lot of people banging the table for the DT that went to Buffalo and even a few banging the table for Blaine Gabbard, but Hurney did his usual top 16 first round pick homerun (outside Derrick Brown) and the rest was history.

I learned with Newton that its traits at the end of the day, and how hard they are as workers as a professional. Do they treat it like a job and a craft that they are compensated to spend the next 10 to 20 years of their life perfecting? You marry talent, traits, and hardwork and you can get something special sometimes. Darnold just doesn't have the traits, he always had a trait of being turnover prone, thay will never change and ya know what? His other traits might be good enough to win you games in the CFL, USFL, Pac-10, but in the NFL turnover prone doesn't work in 2022, especially when you're missing wide open home runs two or three times a game.

Forget an RPO QB being a liability. Either they learn the playbook and apply their traits to the NFL level or get out the way and let Stroud or Young come in here next year and show you how its done.

Newton ran a Zone Read offense, not an RPO.

There are similarities, but they're not the same thing. RPOs have emerged more recently while use of the zone read has been significantly reduced  (at the pro level, at least).

3 hours ago, jayflip said:

I’d pound beers at a tailgate with them 14/10 times before LG or CRA

Those of us who haven't been banned a dozen times or more by them might feel differently.

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52 minutes ago, Mr. Scot said:

Newton ran a Zone Read offense, not an RPO.

There are similarities, but they're not the same thing. RPOs have emerged more recently while use of the zone read has been significantly reduced  (at the pro level, at least).

Those of us who haven't been banned a dozen times or more by them might feel differently.

Newton absolutely utilized the RPO....a lot.

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52 minutes ago, stirs said:

We gave up more sacks than anyone, sometimes ghosts are real.

 

There were 4 other teams that gave up more sacks.

 

Chicago led the league with 59 We had 52. So we were right there.

 

Bears-59

Ravens-57

Bengals-55

Jets-53

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7 hours ago, kungfoodude said:

What about the people like @iamhubby1 whose favorite QB is Sam Darnold?

I wonder if he liked when we were running like 7 play action pass plays in a row without even handing the ball off. At least the QB has the option to run in the RPO. I think the scheme concern is all overrated, Corral had no problem hanging in the pocket in shotgun when he had decent weapons in 2020. He just ran a shitload last year because it was the only way to get 1st downs with the team he was playing for

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3 hours ago, iamhubby1 said:

 

The big IF this year is whether we can actually run the ball effectively? IF we can. That RPO is just that much more potent. I am excited for the possibilities.

We ran the ball effectively last year, the coaches just chose not to. Remember the Giants game where we were basically tied around halftime and then we threw it like 30 times in a row for no reason?

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The problem with the RPO  is exposing your qb to getting hit as a runner which allows a lot more potential for injury. Even Cam got hurt on occasion and he was built like a tight end. Corral isn't that big and got hurt on college running the ball.  He would get crunched in the NFL.

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17 minutes ago, panthers55 said:

The problem with the RPO  is exposing your qb to getting hit as a runner which allows a lot more potential for injury. Even Cam got hurt on occasion and he was built like a tight end. Corral isn't that big and got hurt on college running the ball.  He would get crunched in the NFL.

That’s read option. It’s different. With rpo, I think the QB just reads a particular player at the snap, maybe a lineback or a safety, and either hands it off or throws a pass. I think we did do this with Newton some and it often looked like a jumbled, poorly timed, play action where he had no time to actually pass and ended up taking a sack. 

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24 minutes ago, panthers55 said:

The problem with the RPO  is exposing your qb to getting hit as a runner which allows a lot more potential for injury. Even Cam got hurt on occasion and he was built like a tight end. Corral isn't that big and got hurt on college running the ball.  He would get crunched in the NFL.

RPO doesn't dictate that it's a QB run. That's a third option wrinkle. It's hand off, pass, then qb run.

Why does nobody know what this is .. still?

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8 minutes ago, imminent rogaine said:

That’s read option. It’s different. With rpo, I think the QB just reads a particular player at the snap, maybe a lineback or a safety, and either hands it off or throws a pass. I think we did do this with Newton some and it often looked like a jumbled, poorly timed, play action where he had no time to actually pass and ended up taking a sack. 

I should have clarified that we won't be running an rpo spread offense like Corral ran in college. The spread offense puts your QB at risk in the NFL and McAdoo is supposedly good at scheming protections to help the QB while getting it out quickly. 

 

Just now, Pakmeng said:

RPO doesn't dictate that it's a QB run. That's a third option wrinkle. It's hand off, pass, then qb run.

Why does nobody know what this is 

How did Corral get 500 yards running the ball in Kiffins RPO spread. I thought you can only key off the linebacker and throw it or hand off to the running back. 

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